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Mount David Summit 3 Clubs & Acrivities 72 

Life at Bates 16 Faculty &. Staff. 106 

Arts 32 Underclass 120 

Sports 42 Seniors 132 



Mount David Summit 



A Celebration 



of 



student Academic Achievement 



Mount David Summit is an annual campus-wide celebration of student academic achievement which highlights 
undergraduate research; student creative work in art, dance, theater, music and film/video; projects conducted in the 
context of academic courses; and service-learning. The Summit, sponsored by the Dean of the Faculty and the Mellon 
Learning Associates Program in the Humanities, with generous funding from a grant from the Howard Hughes Medical 
Institute, is a way in which the college spodights the rich intellectual life of its student body. 

This event is not only informative but it is also festive, being well known for always attracting a large number of 
students, faculty, staff, and parents. It provides a wonderful opportunity for younger students to test their presentation 
skills in a supportive environment, and it gives more advanced students the chance to present their individual research 
to a wide audience. Broadly multidisciplinary, the Summit also shows the depth and expanse of scholarship among Bates 
students. 

Named for the "mountain", which is a Bates landmark, the summit comprises two afternoon sessions of poster 
presentations in the Perry Atrium, concurrent panels, and evening presentations of film and dance around the campus. 

On Friday, March 24, 2006, during the fifth annual Mount David Summit, in Pettengill Hall, some 200 Bates 
College students publicly presented their academic and creative efforts, through poster presentations, panel discussions 
and readings, a photography exhibit, film projects and much more. 

The projects presented at this event covered topics as diverse as environmental pollution in Acadia National Park, 
the effects of gender on college aspirations and the evolution of the dance music called reggaeton. Film projects included 
three narrative-fiction pieces and four works produced in a course using video and musical technology to explore 
collaboration in dance and music. Several presentations focused on research or service-learning projects undertaken in 
Lewiston and Auburn, including collaborations with the Lewiston-Aubum Museum, oral histories of the Franco- 
American community, curriculum development and assessment in local schools and literacy initiatives. 

During the early afternoon sessions, in the three-story, glass-walled Perry Atrium, students presented posters 
explaining their research into myriad subjects in the sciences and humanities. Meanwhile, other students discussed their 
projects in panels organized by theme and moderated by faculty. "Memory and the Holocaust," "Measures of the Mind 
and Body in Psychology and Science" and "Themes in Arthurian Literature" are a few of the panel themes. 

The annual Off-Campus Study Photography Exhibition, located in Pettengill Hall, featured some striking images 
of distant locations captured by students studying while being off campus. 

In the evening, students performed dances and showed films made for the course "Atelier," which used new 
technologies to promote collaboration in music and dance. Later during the evening, four seniors projected on screen their 
fictional films entitled "Counter Clockwise," "Estranho, Estranho" and "Sad Robot." 

The following pages will cover descriptions of some of the projects which students presented throughout the 2006 
Mount David Summit. We hope you will enjoy! 



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20 06 Featured Projects 



Sarah Abbott '06, Rachael Levitz '06, and 
Samantha Piro '05 

Lee Abrahamsen, Biology 

Equine Pastern Dermatitis: A Look into the Varied 

Causes of This Common Infection 

Equine pastern dermatitis is a commonly occurring skin 
infection among horses. Also known as scratches, the 
exact cause of this disease is unknown; however, one 
theory states that it is a progressive disease that involves 
the presence of bacteria, fungus, and mites. This study 
looked at the possible causes of scratches by collecting 
lesion samples from eleven draft horses in Maine. 
Bacterial and fungal plates were grown, and outer skin 
and hair samples were collected and examined for 
mites. The Kirby-Bauer antibiotic sensitivity test was 
initiated to test for antibiotic resistance among common 
treatments for scratches. We found a wide variety of 
predominantly Gram-positive bacteria, which were most 
sensitive to penicillin and chlorhexidine. We found no 
mites or predominant fungus in any sample. Our results 
suggest that bacteria play a role in chronic scratches. 

Jeffrey Addis '06 

John Strong, Religion 

Thai Sangha HIV/AIDS Projects: Approaching the 

Pandemic in a Buddhist Context 

I have investigated Thai Buddhist clergy members' 
responses to the pandemic by 1 ) reshaping or revitalizing 
their roles in secular society; and 2) formulating a 
religious framework, incorporating traditional doctrines 
with biomedical understandings of transmission and 
contraction, with the aim of ending the suffering from 
AIDS. Distinct from ending AIDS, ending the suffering 
from AIDS is rooted in eliminating ignorance which 
entails following Buddhist moral commandments — 
such as not visiting brothels — as well as considering the 
concept of nirvana. 

Christine Arsnow '08 

Sylvia Federico, English 

An Author's Responsibility: T. H. White's Message to 

World War II Era Youth 

T. H. White's The Once and Future King is written to an 
audience of British children in the midst of World War 
II. As a popular children's author. White believes that it 
is his responsibility to use his power to guide a disoriented 
generation towards peace and unity. He uses examples 
throughout the novel to convey the temptation of evil, 
the danger of indifference, and the hopeful prospect of 
peace after the war. 



Gabriel Belsky '06 

Todd Kahan, Psychology 

Is Negative Priming Dependent on Prime-Trial 

Interference? 

People are slower to respond to stimuli that were 
previously ignored relative to stimuli that were not 
previously ignored. In these negative priming 
experiments participants respond to two items: the 
prime and probe. On the prime participants respond to 
target information, under the guidance of a cue such as 
color, while distracting information is present. In the 
subsequent display, the probe, participants respond to a 
target in the same fashion. People show increased 
latency of response when the target on the probe trial 
matches the distractor from the prime, relative to 
situations where the target on the probe trial bears no 
relation to the prime-trial distractor. This study evaluates 
whether negative priming is dependent upon prime 
conflict, and prime-probe response alternation. 
Participants are 30 undergraduate students from a 
northern New England liberal arts college, between 18 
and 22 years of age. Implications for theories of selective 
attention are discussed. 

Lindley Brainard '06 

Heather Lindkvist, Anthropology 
Allopathic and Alternative Medicine at a Crossroads: 
The Impact of Edgar Cayce on Contemporary 
Holistic Medicine 

During a time in which concepts of holistic healing were 
non-existent in the United States and allopathic medicine 
was beginning to dominate the medical field, Edgar 
Cayce, a clairvoyant diagnostician, was prescribing 
holistic treatments. Because of this, contemporary 
practitioners often credit Cayce as the "father of holistic 
health" in the United States. Cayce' s treatments of 
patients often employed both known and unknown 
methods of healing, including traditional western 
medicine, osteopathy, homeopathy, hydrotherapy, 
natural remedies, and different chemical interventions. 
In line with modem holistic approaches to healing, his 
recommended treatments encompassed the whole 
person, going beyond physical symptoms to address the 
mental, emotional, and spiritual needs of the patient. 
This presentation examines Edgar Cayce' s work as a 
medical diagnostician, his influence in the contemporary 
holistic health movement, and how he opened the door 
to the current holistic health movement during a time 
when allopathic methods dominated the field of 
medicine. 



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Siena Calabro '06 

John Kelsey, Psychology 

Effects ofSR141716, a CBl Receptor Antagonist, on the 
Establishment and Expression of Locomotor 
Sensitization to Nicotine Administration 

Recent studies have found that cannabinoid antagonists — 
drugs that block specific cannabinoid receptors in the 
brain — are effective in reducing the self administration 
and the conditioned place preference of drugs such as 
cocaine, opiates, alcohol, and nicotine. These findings 
suggest that cannabinoid antagonists may be helpful in 
reducing the addictive properties of drugs. The current 
experiment will explore the effects of a cannabinoid 
antagonist (SR141716) on a measure of addiction in rats, 
called locomotor sensitization. 

It is predicted that 
SR141716 will reduce the 
increased activity of the rat 
due to a nicotine injection. 
In preliminary data, 
SR141716 appears to 
suppress the activity 
produced by nicotine, but 
does not appear to prevent 
the development of 
sensitization as measured on 
a challenge test given with 
SR141716. More tests will 
soon be completed to 
determine the overall effect 
of SR 14 17 16 on nicotine 

addiction in rats. Perry Atrium 

Sorina Crisan '07, Kathleen Hluchyj '06, 
Christina Jones '07, Sophie Mann '08, Lois St. Brice 
'07, Caitlin Tamposi '08 and Rebecca Westlake '07 

Francisca Lopez, Spanish 
Visions of Morocco 

During Short Term 2005, seven of us went to Morocco 
for two-and-a-half weeks as part of French/Spanish s32 
(Morocco: Sites of Cultural Encounters). We traveled to 
eleven different cities, experiencing the diversity of 
Moroccan landscapes from the Sahara Desert, to farmland, 
to the Spanish influenced northern coast. We concentrated 
our academic research on the role of women, the 
developing economy, the role of religion, and cultural 
influences in post-colonial Moroccan society. We each 
kept a daily journal of our experiences in French, English, 
or Spanish, three of the spoken languages in that country. 
Our poster reflects the varied landscapes and economic 
markets of this diverse country. 



Jessica Edgerly '06 

William Ambrose, Biology 

Trophic Role of the Invasive Crab Carcinus maenas in 
a Southern Maine Marsh Described by Stable Isotopes 
and Gut Contents 

Carcinus maenas, the invasive green crab, is highly 
abundant in southern Maine marshes, though it is largely 
unstudied in this ecosystem. My study explores the diet 
and trophic position of Carcinus at sites along the York 
River using stomach content and stable isotope analyses. 
While plant and algal material was common, benthic 
invertebrates dominated. However, the relative abundance 
of clams, polycheates, and crustaceans varied greatly 
among sites, variations likely due to differences in prey- 
communitycomposition. Based on isotopic values of prey 

species, determined 
fractionation factors 
(1.4-2.60/00 and 2.5- 
2.90/00 enriched in 
13C and 15N, 
respectively), and gut 
content data, I made 
predictions as to the 
origin of Carcinus' 
isotopic signature (a 
13C = -15.4±0.3%c; 
al5N = 10.8±0.3%c). 
These predictions 
supported results of 
other marsh studies, 
describing a generali- 
zed predator of benthic 
invertebrates, and therefore a potential diversion of energy 
from native benthic predators. 

Brian Dupee '06 

William Ambrose, Biology 

The Effect of Baitworm Digging and Epibentic Predation 
on the Growth and Survivorship of theSoft-Shelled 
Clam Myaarenariaa/i</o/i the Abundance and Diversity 
of Soft-Sediment Infauna 

The effects of harvesting intertidal species on soft-sediment 
communities are relatively unknown. We examined the 
effects of digging for blood worms {Glycera dihramhiata ), 
epibenthic predation, and the interaction between the two 
on the growth and survivorship of juvenile and 
commercial-sized soft-shelled clams {Mya arenaria) as 
well as on infaunal species abundance and diversity. 
Commercialand juvenile-sized clams were seeded into 
dug and undug plots on an intertidal mudflat in mid-coast 
Maine. Caging treatments were established in all plots for 
predator exclusion. Preliminary results suggest that 




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digging reduces the abundances of Heteromastusfiliformis 
and Gemma gemma by 46% and 64% respectively, while 
digging increased the abundance of Nereis virens 63%. 
Caging and the interaction between digging and caging 
had no significant effect on infaunal abundances. 
Preliminary results also indicated that digging had a 
negative effect on growth and survivorship rates of 
juvenileand commercial-sized clams. Understanding the 
effects of digging and predation on the survival and 
growth of the soft-shelled clam and on infaunal abundance 
will elucidate the degree of community response to digging, 
enabling effective management of intertidal communities 
and the bait worm fishery. 

Marian Goddard '07 

Elizabeth Tobin, History 
Four Memoirs of Hidden 
Girl Survivors of the 
Holocaust 

Jewish children in Europe 
were specific targets of 
Nazism because children 
represented the future of 
Judaism. Only six to seven 
percent of European 
Jewish children were left 
alive at the end of the 
Holocaust. The majority 
of these surviving children 
were hidden by gentile 
rescuers. The memoirs of 
hidden children are 

significant for Rashel Burton '07, Kate Russell '06 & Erika 

constructing a complete Holocaust history because until 
recently, hidden children did not engage with their past. 
What are common aspects of how young girls hidden in 
Poland remember their hidden childhood? I found that the 
four memoirs I read identify invisibility and cravings for 
normalcy as common experiences of hidden girls. They 
also share a unique style, which simulates a child's voice, 
obviously influenced by an adult perspective. 

Sam Golden '06 

John Kelsey, Psychology 

The Role of Extracellular- Signal Regulated Kinase 
(ERK) in the Nucleus Accumbens on Nicotine-Induced 
Behavioral Sensitization in the Rat 

Drug abuse is believed to be enhanced via direct or 
indirect activation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic 
pathway originating in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) 
and projecting to the nucleus accumbens (NAc). For 



example, nicotine is presumed to exert its addictive effects 
by binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on the cell 
bodies of dopaminergic neurons in the VTA. This action 
presumably mimics the effects of naturally reinforcing 
stimuli, essentially hijacking the normal role of dopamine 
neurons from coding proper reward prediction errors. 
However, the molecular basis of this process is not well 
understood. Recent evidence suggests that psychomotor 
stimulants such as cocaine are able to hijack the normal role 
of these neurons by elevating levels of the intracellular 
enzyme called extracellular-signaling related kinase (ERK) 
within dopamine neurons, possibly leading to the formation 
of detrimental neuroadaptations. However, the role of this 
protein in response-repeated chronic nicotine administration 
is unknown. To further elucidate the possible role of ERK 

in nicotine 

addiction, the effect 
of bilateral 

intracranial NAc 
infusions of the 
ERK-inhibiting drug 
U0126 on nicotine- 
induced behavioral 
sensitization was 
examined. It was 
hypothesized that 
these infusions 
would attenuate 
development and 
expression of 

locomotor 
sensitization, 

Tanaka 06 SUggCStiug that the 

suggesting that the ERK signaling cascade within the NAc 
does play a vital role in the development of this behavior. 
However, no statistically significant effect of U0126 
administration was observed and neither the acquisition 
nor expression of nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization 
was prevented. This may suggest an alternative mechanism 
for nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization, following a 
distinct molecular process as compared to other 
psychomotor stimulants. Research is currently ongoing to 
further validate or dispute this possibility. 

Joanna Good '06 

Kathryn Low, Psychology 

The Effects on Daily Physical Activity through the Use of 
a Pedometer-Based Motivational Interviewing Program 
within a Primary Care Setting 

Due to an epidemic of obesity, physical activity 
interventions programs are gaining widespread attention 




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The pedometer is a useful intervention tool for both 
motivating people to increase physical activity and for 
accurately measuring patterns of daily activity. The 
behavioral change technique of motivational 
interviewing (MI) has also been shown to increase 
physical activity and to raise retention rates in such 
intervention programs. Additionally, the primary care 
setting has been identified as an advantageous setting to 
implement these programs. This study recruited a 
sedentary population (N=29) at a local primary care 
practice and implemented an eight-week, pedometer- 
based, motivational interviewing program. This study 
looks at the short- and long-term effects of the program 
on daily steps, physiological factors, and energy and 
mood. Our goal is to build on the findings regarding 
pedometer programs, MI, and interventions in primary 
care settings by using a case-control approach to better 
understand the impacts of all three interventions on 
physical activity levels. 

Megan Hamilton '06 

Robert Famsworth, English 
Alice Munro 's The Beggar Maid 

The development of author Alice Munro, as a writer 
hinges on her 1979 publication of The Beggar Maid. 
Stories from the collection, including "Privilege," 
"Simon' s Luck" and the title work, "The Beggar Maid," 
brought Munro from being vaguely memorable to 
becoming an inimitable force on the literary scene. 
Much of that power comes from Munro' s renewed 
engagement with her own memories and her subsequent 
impulse to consider her own narrative techniques and 
strategies. While the character of Rose may be fiction, 
Munro' s stories illustrate much about the author's own 
dance with the past and her ultimate assertion of her 
own unique authority. 

Amanda Harrow '06 

Georgia Nigro, Psychology 

Interventions for Young Children Who Have Witnessed 

Domestic Violence 

Domestic violence has been identified as a national 
public health crisis, the leading cause of injury to 
women. Battered women are not the only victims of 
domestic violence, however. Although often overlooked, 
their children also suffer from such violence. In the 
United States, it is estimated that up to 10 million 
children witness domestic violence annually. Children 
exposed to domestic violence often experience emotional ' 
disturbances and are more likely to engage in violent or 
aggressive behavior in the future, yet relatively little 
attention has been dedicated to developing effective 



interventions or evaluating the existing interventions for 
these children. In my thesis, I examine the theoretical 
underpinnings and content of three intervention programs 
used with young children who have witnessed domestic 
violence. The thesis culminates in a set of 
recommendations for the local domestic violence agency 
where I have worked for the past two years. 

Susan Hawes '08 

Patricia Buck, Education 

Lewiston Adult Learning Center and Bates College 
Collaboration: Public Health Curriculum for English 
for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Classrooms 

Professor Patricia Buck, Zachary Risler '08, and I are 
working to develop a public health curriculum that can 
be used in ESOL classrooms at the Adult Learning 
Center in Lewiston. After meeting with people involved 
in different aspects of this project— including Bates 
professors doing research on the Somali population, and 
local hospitals and clinics who deal with patients who 
don't speak English — we decided to make videos for the 
classrooms. Our poster shows the process of our work, 
including information from interviews that contain past 
research related to public health issues for the ESOL 
population in Lewiston and our plans for the first video 
which is about dealing with an emergency. The poster 
features photographs of what we will dramatize in the 
video, including a car accident, 9-1-1 calls, arrival of 
rescue workers, and other steps related to dealing with 
an emergency. 




Aliza Luft 'Oh 



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Meghan Helliesen '06 

Rebecca Fraser-Thill, Psychology 
From Buzzing Confusion to Jealousy and Empathic 
Concern: Reexamining Emotional and Social 
Development in Infancy 

The purpose of this study was to expand upon the 

developing findings that infants as young as six months 

old have the capacity to experience "nonbasic" emotions 

such as jealousy and empathy, by investigating these 

emotions in the presence of their peers. The current study 

examined the theoretical implications of infant 

interpersonal awareness through a triadic methodology 

whereby three infants were placed in a room together and 

observed through a one-way mirror. Statistical analyses 

on affect and gaze direction were run along with qualitative 

analyses on the overall 

group dynamic. The 

expected outcome, that 

infants will engage in 

social interactions and 

display forms of jealousy 

and empathy when it is 

evoked, has an immense 

theoretical impact on 

mainstream 

developmental theories. 

Further implications of the 

findings include the 

identification of emotional 

milestones and the 

implementation of early 

intervention methods for 

those infants who do not 

meet those milestones. 



Images from the sixth annual Off-Campus Study Photography. 



Bernard Herlyn '06 

Claudia Aburto Guzman, Spanish 
Cuban Exiles and Anti-Castro Groups 

The poster examines the history of Cuban immigration to 
the United States since the Cuban Revolution in 1959. For 
most Cubans, coming to the United States was supposed 
to be a temporary visit, as they desired to return to Cuba 
once Fidel Castro was removed from power. Throughout 
the 1960s and 1970's, Cubans came in waves to Miami 
and other parts of the United States. Numerous exile 
groups emerged in the 1960s to overthrow Castro and 
spread anti-Castro propaganda, including paramilitary 
groups, who staged violent attacks in Cuba and the United 
States. By the end of the 1 970s, violent resistance decreased 
and political lobbying became the norm. During the 
1980s the Cuban- American community became more 



autonomous as organizations like the Cuban American 
National Foundation gained political clout. Throughout 
this time. United States-Cuba relations soured, and a new 
wave of migration in the mid- 1 990s only helped to further 
this rift. 

Charlene Impey '06 

Loring Danforth, Anthropology 

Making Citizens, Making Soldiers: The Militarization 

of an American High School 

At Lewiston High School (LHS) and over 1,500 other 
American high schools, students walk the halls in military 
uniform and practice drill in the school's gym as part of 
their normal day as high school students and members of 
the Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corp. The JROTC, 

funded and created by 
the Department of 
Defense, is a military 
program designed for 
high school students. 
Critics of the JROTC 
claim that it is a 
recruiting strategy 
and a means for 
indoctrinating youth 
with military 

ideology. 

The Department of 
Defense refutes these 
accusations and 
argues that it is an 
academic program of 
civic education aimed 
at "motivating youth 
to be better Americans." My analysis of the JROTC 
focuses on how the discourses used in this debate position 
the JROTC in relation to LHS. Using Foucault's concepts 
of discourse, power/knowledge, and genealogy, I examine 
how the extension of modem disciplinary power to the 
military has intensified the process of militarization and 
enabled the JROTC to be "just another program" at LHS. 
The goal of this thesis is not to evaluate the JROTC, but 
rather to examine it as a form of militarization of American 
schools and citizenship. 

Margaret Joyce '06 

Robert Allison, Religion 

When Nails Don 't Hang: An Examination of How 

Jesus Hung on the Cross 

The tension between science and religion within modem 
society has illuminated the tenuous nature of various 




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religious assertions. Forensic pathologist Pierre Barbet 
conducted medical experiments nailing cadavers to 
crosses to determine the cause of Jesus' death. His 
conclusions were that it was not anatomically possible 
that Jesus was nailed to the cross through the hands as 
represented in Christian tradition; and that the cause of 
death may have been bloodless - asphyxiation or 
cardiac arrest and shock. My poster presents Barbet' s 
findings, along with archeological evidence and 
hypothetical diagrams to hypothesize how Jesus most 
likely was crucified. j/^ 

Jordan Keeler '06 

Kathryn Low, Psychology ^ 

Female Sexual Dysfunction and Communication in 
College Relationships 

This study seeks to determine not only the prevalence of 
dysfunction among college-age females, both 
heterosexual and homosexual, but also to determine 
what role communication between partners plays in 
sexual function in young women. Participants are 
college-age couples both, heterosexual and lesbian 
(female genitalia), who have been together for at least 
four weeks and have had some form of sexual contact 
either together or solo. Participants were given two 
questionnaires, one being the Female Sexual Function 
Index and the other an Intimate Communication 
Disclosure Questionnaire. I believe that my results will 
show that the participants in the homosexual relationship 
will have a more accurate sense of their female partner' s 
sexual function than the male in the heterosexual 
relationship. I also believe that if the first statement 
proves to be true that the homosexual partners may 
show fewer signs of female sexual dysfunction and 
possibly a higher level of communication between the 
couples than heterosexual couples. 

Alexandra Kelly '09 

Sylvia Federico, English 

The Technique of History: An Analysis o/ History of 

the Kings of Britain and Quest for King Arthur 

This paper is a discussion of the techniques employed 
by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his chronicle, History of 
the Kings of Britain, and director Don Campbell in his 
documentary, Quest for King Arthur, to achieve a 
semblance credibility and truth in discussion of the 
mythical history of King Arthur. Working eight hundred 
years apart, they accomplished this end through 
association with respected historical sources and the 
matter of medieval Britain, and both also used the 



humility topos to win their audience's trust. In addition, 
each work uses the visual and narrative techniques 
available in its media to capture and hold that audience's 
attention, and to make it believe, perhaps in spite of its 
better judgment, in at least some element of the Arthurian 
legend. 

Rachael Levitz '06 

Lee Abrahamsen, Biology 

A Review of Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Why 

Methotrexate Is Still in Use 

Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is a common 
autoimmune disease that affects children younger than 
sixteen. The prevalence of the disease in the United 
States has increased in the last few decades. The recent 
completion of the Human Genome Project has allowed 
scientists to look at specific genetic factors that can be 
used as markers for diagnosing juvenile rheumatoid 
arthritis. As knowledge grows about the causes and 
progression of the disease, new drugs like Etanercept 
are being designed to target specific factors in the 
disease's pathogenesis. These new drugs can be 
compared with older drugs such as methotrexate, which 
broadly target central metabolic pathways in the body. 
Treatment for this disease is crucial because JRA is 
unpreventable. The outcome of JRA differs from patient 
to patient, but complete remission of all symptoms is 
only possible with the help of drug therapy. 



Andrea Lichtman '06 

Amy B. Douglass, Psychology 
Post-Identification Feedback: Manipulating Beliefs 
about the Number of Eyewitnesses and Measuring 
Credibility 

Misidentifications by highly confident witnesses are a 
leading cause of the conviction of innocent defendants. 
Inaccurate witnesses can be made confident by post- 
identification feedback suggesting that their 
identification was accurate (i.e., confirming feedback). 
An experiment was conducted to explore whether 
feedback affects some witnesses more than others. 
Participants were led to believe that they were either the 
only witness (solo identification context) or one of 
several witnesses (multiple identification context) 
viewing a video and making an identification from a 
target-absent lineup. Following their identifications, 
participants were given either confirming feedback or 
no feedback regarding their identifications. Participant- 
witnesses' responses were measured on 
testimonyrelevant dependent variables including 



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retrospective confidence. Results provide information 
about the potential for identification context to moderate 
the effects of feedback. 

Adam Macbeth '06 

Steven Dillon, English %^ 

Film: Sad Robot 

A teenage bike courier suffers under the weight of his 
own affinity for popular culture. His reality starts to 
blur as he begins to understand himself as a character in 
a film. Frustration ensues. The film is forty minutes 
long. 



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James Maldonis '06 

Paula Schlax, Chemistry 

Identification of Contact Points between Cross-Linked 

ncRNA DsrA and E. coli SI Ribosomal Protein 

Under harsh environmental stress such as depleted 
nutrients or lack of oxygen, E. coli expresses a different 
set of genes than under normal conditions. This stress 
response is regulated by the rpoS gene, which is under 
the control of several factors including the small, non- 
coding RNA DsrA. DsrA interacts with the small 30S 
ribosomal subunit and SI ribosomal protein, which 
causes rpoS to become activated. >4.l\\. 

Understanding where SI and DsrA interact is very 
important to further studying this system and the general 
gene expression E. coli. Utilizing ultraviolet cross- 
linking, affinity separation, and either an RNase or 
protease digestion, the contact points between DsrA 
and S 1 can be determined. 

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Daniel Masterson '06 

Arlene MacLeod, Political Science 

Moving the Mountain: Small Community 

Development and Women's Empowerment in 

Mokattam, Cairo 

The Mokattam garbage collector community has long 



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been one of the poorest populations in Cairo. Two 
private voluntary organizations have guided the 
community through significant growth and development 
since the mid- 1 980s. These organizations have upgraded 
technology leading to higher efficiency and safety 
standards; formed a microlending program for men, 
which failed; created a microlending program for women, 
which is a continuing success; raised health standards 
for the community and instituted health education for 
women; and formed a literacy, recycling, and job- 
training program for the women of Mokattam, which is 
the proudest achievement of the development projects. 
The failures and successes of the Mokattam programs 
are used by small-community development 
organizations around the world for the lessons they 
provide. I consider methods of poverty alleviation or 
poverty elimination these organizations in Mokattam 
pursue and whether they are effective in achieving their 
goals. 

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Omar Maxwell '06 

Baltasar Fra-Mohnero, Spanish ^^^ 

The Evolution of Reggaeton 

The evolution of reggaeton traces the birth and rapid 
growth of the latest musical genre to take the world 
by storm, its influence on different populations, and 
its potential impact in the future. Using North 
American hip-hop, Jamaican dancehall, and a variety 
of Afro-Latino musical traditions from Latin 
America, this eclectic musical hybrid addresses 
many of the social, economic, and political issues 
facing people of color in today's world. In order to 
better understand the origins and impact of 
reggaeton' s lyrical content and melodic rhythm, 
study of its beginnings and development is critical. 

Tanya Nauvel '06 

David Haines, Mathematics 

Independent Component Analysis, a New Way of 

Analyzing EEC Data 

Independent component analysis (ICA) belongs to a 
class of blind source separation (BSS) methods for 
separating data into underlying informational 
components of various types of data, such as images, 
sounds telecommunications, and in this particular case, 
in neuroimaging. Using electroencephalography (EEC), 
data was collected from a number of subjects who were 
taught to tap a particular sequence of musical rhythm, 
the goal being to find the relationship between the 
change in rhythm and the areas of the brain that are 
being activated. ICA is a novel method for analyzing 
EEC data. It is a mathematical modeling method used 



Nicole Nadeau "06 



(D 



to decompose the signals into their original sources, using 
a variety of mathematical methods ranging from probability 
and statistics to linear algebra or information theory. 

Nicole Nadeau '06 

Mary Rice-DeFosse, French, and David Scobey, Harward 
Center for Community Partnerships 
Rooted in the St. John Valley 

I will present my French thesis, a compilation of interviews, 
photographs, and research from the St. John Valley. I 
focus on the Franco-American/Canadian culture and 
language through conversations with my own family and 
their experiences growing up in Northern Maine. 

Terence O'Connell '06 and Emily Rand '06 

Mary Rice-DeFosse, 
French 

Franco-American Oral 
History Project 

We gathered research 
data from the personal 
histories of Franco- 
Americans (Americans of 
French Canadians 
descent) living in the 
Lewiston-Auburn area 
through video interviews. 
We recorded the 
interviews in an effort to 
capture not only the 
importance of the French 
language to local Francos, 
but also to document and 

preserve their rich identities and French culture. There are 
many Franco- Americans living in our local area although 
one would not be aware of this because of language loss 
that has taken place over the last half-century. We 
emphasize not the French language itself, but the histories 
of the Francos themselves. We are working in conjunction 
with the Franco- American Heritage Center in Lewiston, 
and an exhibition outlining our work will be on display at 
the center. 

Brad Oriel '06 

John Kelsey, Psychology 

Independent and Synergistic Modulation of Adenosine 
and Dopamine Receptors Improves Forepaw Stepping 
in a 6-OHDA Parkinsonian Rat Model 

Parkinson's disease (PD) is marked by the 
neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons along the 
nigrostriatal pathway. The objective of this study was to 




establish the therapeutic qualities associated with 
adenosine Ai and Ai a receptors. The selective dopamine 
neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine was administered 
unilaterally in the medial forebrain bundle to create a 
hemiparkinsonian rat model. Motor function was 
quantitatively assessed via forepaw stepping. Caffeine 
(15 mg/kg) and L-dopa (8 

mg/kg) significantly improved stepping in the impaired 
contralateral paw, with L-dopa being more efficacious. 
Moreover, combining treatments improved stepping more 
than either drug independently suggesting a synergistic 
effect. In a second experiment, the selective A2a antagonist 
SCH-58261 (3.5 mg/kg) was found to improve stepping. 
In neither experiment was stepping normalized. Further 
experimentation will examine the effects of antagonists 

and agonists of the 
Ai receptor. The 
present results 
support caffeine's 
action on A2a 
receptors and further 
indicate that 

combinatory 
treatment with L- 
dopa may provide 
synergistic benefits 
for improving the 
motor symptoms of 
PD. 



President Elaine Tuttle Hansen & Brad Oriel '06 



Allegra Poggio '06 

Amy Douglass, Psychology 

Conformity in Mock Jury Deliberations: The Impact of 

Task Difficulty, Defendant's Race, and Race Salience 

Various studies examine conformity among individuals 
in group settings. A particularly interesting venue to 
research conformity is jury deliberations. Jury deliberations 
are an essential component of the legal system. This study 
manipulated three variables in a case summary — task 
difficulty, race of the defendant, and race salience — and 
examined how those factors affect the subject' s conformity 
in a mock jury deliberation. The study used a mock 
deliberation setting used in a previous study (Kassin et al.. 
1990). The experiment was designed in such a way that 
the participant read a case summary in which each of the 
variables mentioned above was manipulated. After the 
participant read the case, he or she wrote down a decision 
with a two-sentence explanation. After doing so, the 



■f- 



participant was given five notes with the verdicts of the 
other participants. The experiment was set up so that the 
participant's decision would always be in the minority. 
After viewing the decisions of the other participant, the 
participant was asked to write down a second verdict. 
There were three rounds of deliberations. Conformity 
was assessed by the number of people who changed their 
vote in each condition. 

Nathaniel Purinton '06 and Michael Wilson '07 

David Scobey, Harward Center for Community 

Partnerships 

Sentimentalism and the Lewiston-Auburn Community: 

Representations of Life in a Mill Town 

As part of American Cultural Studies/History 390B 
(History in the Public Sphere), we attended the Lewiston 
play, Lewiston: A New 
Home, a romanticized 
version of Lewiston mill 
workers' lives, more 
specifically, the Franco- 
American experience in 
Lewiston. Interviews 
with community elders 
seemed to affirm a certain 
idyllic lifestyle during the 
mill era. While 
researching the history of 
the Franco-American 
community as part of an 
exhibit for Museum L-A, 
facets 



certain 



of 



Michael Wilson "06 



community life did mesh 
with the play's themes; however, A New Home failed to 
comment on key issues such as class and social divisions 
within the Lewiston population. We discuss the numerous 
dilemmas we encountered when trying to create an 
exhibit retelling history in the public arena, including the 
difficulty reconciling the romanticized and realistic 
version of the Lewiston mill workers' experience. 

Catherine Reedy '06 

John Kelsey, Psychology 

Site of Therapeutic Action for Caffeine in an Animal 

Model of Parkinson 's Disease 

Research has suggested that adenosine receptor 
antagonists are therapeutic in Parkinson's Disease (PD) 
either because of their interaction with L-DOPA in the 
dorsal striatum (direct pathway) or their inhibition of the 
overactive striatal-pallidal (indirect) pathway at the 
striatum and the external segment of the globus pallidus 



(GPE). To test for the primary therapeutic action of 
adenosine antagonists, we measured the behavioral effects 
of local infusions of caffeine, an Al, A2A, and A2B 
antagonist, into both the dorsal striatum and the external 
segment of the globus pallidus (GPE) in the forepaw 
stepping rat model of PD. Method: Unilateral injections 
of X ul 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the medial 
forebrain bundle (MFB) produced a rat hemiparkinsonian 
model in 20 Long-Evans rats. Caffeine ( 1 1 of 1 .0, 2.0, and 
4.0 g/1 or 1 .0 1 of 0.9% saline solution) was injected into 
the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPE) and 
then into the striatum through guide cannulas. The forepaw 
stepping test was the quantitative measure of motor 
performance and improvements. Results: When injected 
into the GPE, 2.0 and 4.0 g, but not 1.0 g caffeine 
improved stepping with the contralateral paw compared 

to saline (p< 0.0009). 
Data collected on 
caffeine' s behavioral 
effects when injected 
in the striatum, and 
we hope to examine 
the interaction of 
these central 

injections of caffeine 
with systemic L- 
DOPA. As the 
effects of these 
central injections of 
caffeine are larger 
than those of 
systemic injections, 
these data highlight 
the importance of the GPE in mediating these therapeutic 
effects of caffeine. A comparison of these effects to those 
produced by injections into the dorsal striatum important 
in indicating if the role of the GPE is unique. The need to 
understand where and how adenosine antagonists work 
therapeutically in PD is especially exigent as these drugs 
enter human testing and become a new line of monotherapy 
or are combined with L-DOPA. 



Marcia Reinauer '06 

Sue Houchins, African American Studies and English 
Film: 'Counter Clockwise' 

Come see the short English senior thesis movie about 
Ethel's struggle with time travel. Written, directed, 
produced, and edited by Marcia Reinauer '06. Featuring 
Maggie McCally '08, Deborah Paley, David Hulbert, 
Sophie Hulbert, and Karen Ball. Narrated by Ross Ingham 




®' 



'06 Music by Maxwell Butler '06. Mnemonic 
Productions; rated PG; runtime 24 minutes. 

Elizabeth Santy '06 

Georgia Nigro, Psychology 

Disney Princesses and the Female Stereotype 

This study examines which aspects of the female 
stereotype are most compelling for young girls. Because 
of their familiarity and popularity, the Disney princesses 
were utilized as examples of the current female 
stereotype. Young girls were told several vignettes 
about their favorite Disney princess. Some of these 
vignettes contained a physical deviation, some contained 
a behavioral deviation, some contained both of these 
deviations, some were taken directly from the relevant 
movie, and some were fabricated but contained no 
deviation of personality or appearance. The girls were 
asked to determine how likely their chosen princess 
would be to participate in the story read. Current 
psychological and women's studies literature suggest 
that the physical aspects are most important in the 
maintenance of the female stereotype. Thus, it was 
hypothesized that the stories containing physical 
deviations would be the hardest for the participants to 
connect with their princess. 



W 



Alison Schwartz '08 

Sylvia Federico, English |i|^ | 

Mary Queen of Scots: A Personification of Scotland as 
a Whole? 

Mary Queen of Scots has intrigued historians and students 
alike throughout history. At a young age Mary was sent 
to France, where she became the wife of the Dauphin at 
the mere age of fifteen. She lived most of her young life 
in France; however, her husband died was she was still 
relatively young. She decided to return to Scotland, 
instead of staying under the watchful eye of her 
stepmother. Some say that Mary personifies Scotland as 
a whole from her feminine nature, struggles with England, 
and problems with the English with religious reformers. 
Mary Queen of Scots is a figure of both mystery and 
intrigue. I intend to prove that by her nature and in her life 
she mirrors the struggle and character of Scotland in its 
entirety. 

Katie Seamon '06 

Diane Haughney, Political Science 
Texaco Nunca Mas 

For my senior thesis I studied the Indigenous Rights 
Movement in Ecuador. In 1992 the indigenous people 



filed suit against Texaco for damages done to the 
environment and human health as a result of oil 
development. My poster display covers the history of 
the case and the effect that oil development has had on 
the people on the Ecuadorian Amazon. 

David Thomazy '07 

Hong Lin, Physics 

Linewidth Narrowing by Optical Feedback in a Multi- 
Mode Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser 

We have studied experimentally spectral characteristics 
of a multi-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser 
that is subject to optical feedback. Appropriate alignment 
of the feedback mirror can suppress higher-order modes 
and significantly decrease the spectral linewidth of the 
laser. 

-,* 
Anne Tiernan '06 

Stephanie Kelley-Romano, Rhetoric 

Captivity Narratives and the Unknown Frontier 

As Americans, many of us tend to classify the unfamiliar 
using archetypal language. This presentation critically 
examines the captivity genre. I compare and contrast 
narratives of Indian captivity, alien abduction, and war 
captivity. I primarily focus on the similarities in language 
used to describe "the Other" within each genre of 
narrative. Typically when in a position of subordinance 
in another culture or at an unknown frontier (e.g., the 
West during American expansionism, outer space, Iran), 
Americans tend to describe "the Other" as inferior or 
barbaric. They describe both the people and their 
practices as substandard relative to Americans. There 
are often very strong parallels in the descriptive language 
used within the narratives genres. Further, I use the 
archetypal journey of initiation as well as the themes of 
capture, transformation, and return in each genre of 
captivity as foci for analysis. 

Jose Gabriel Tungol '06 

J. Roxanne Prichard, Psychology 
Melatonin in Treatment of Depression 

In order to establish the relationship between changes in 
melatonin and depressive affect, we will be comparing 
performance on behavioral tests of depression with 
plasma melatonin levels in a rat model of depression. 
The efficacy of photoperiod therapy and drug 
administrations will be analyzed within the context of 
depressive behavior and circadian modulation of 
melatonin. Specifically, the project aims are to 1 ) evaluate 
influence of three lighting schedules — short, long, and 
normal — on endogenous photopic and scotopic 






'© 



melatonin levels in depressed and non-depressed rats; 2) 
correlate depressive and anxiety behaviors in these 
lighting schedules with levels of melatonin; 3) evaluate 
and compare the influence of two drug therapies (SSRI 
anti-depressants and melatonin) on change in depressive 
and anxiety behaviors; 4) correlate these drug therapies 
with changes in melatonin levels in depressed and 
nondepressedrats; and 5) analyze the interactions between 
photopic and scotopic melatonin levels, drug treatments, 
photoperiod, and change in depressive and anxiety 
behaviors. 



A. 



Katharina Unger '06 

T. Glen Lawson, Chemistry 

Substrate Recognition in the Ubiquitin-Proteasome 

Pathway 

Essential to the survival of all organisms are mechanisms 
that control protein function and maintenance, as well as 
those that degrade proteins. The ubiquitin-proteasome 
system is one of several ways that degradation occurs: a 
protein is tagged by ubiquitin molecules and subsequently 
is degraded by a proteasome complex. In this project I 
will analyze the functioning of this system by measuring 
its ability to ubiquitinate proteins that need to be degraded. 
I will compare ubiquitination for proteins that have 
various N-terminal amino acids and either have a 
destruction box, a sequence of ten amino acids that 
signals for protein destruction, or do not 



Sarah Wilson '06 

Lynne Lewis, Economics 
A Hedonic Property Valuation on the Kennebec River: 
Did the Removal of the Edwards Dam Affect Property 
Values? _ -* 

This poster presents the results of a hedonic property 
value analysis of the Kennebec River Valley. Results are 
presented for seven different towns located above, below, 
and at the former Edwards Dam site. We have a very 
thorough data set of over 3,000 houses that were sold 
between 1997 and 2005; the Edwards Dam was 
successfully removed from Augusta in 1999. We used 
Geographic Information Systems software to create 
maps of the area and then geocoded the houses and 
found distances to the river and the former dam site. We 
include land-use data and look for effects of factors such 
as open space, housing density, and hazardous waste 
sites around the river. The ultimate goal is to see what 
effects the removal of the dam has had on property value 
in the area. Our hypothesis is that property value will go 
up after the removal of the Edwards Dam for houses 
located closest to the dam site. For houses further from 



the dam and from the river, we believe there will be less 
of an influence on their value. 



Andrea Wolf '06 

Baltasar Fra-Molinero, Spanish 

Aymara Textiles: Where Tradition and Modernity 

Meet 

After spending a semester abroad in Chile and initiating 
a study of the textiles of indigenous Aymara weavers in 
the altiplano and Lake Titicaca basin of the central 
Andes, I have been fortunate to return to this region and 
continue doing interviews and research. Through my 
travels, I have come to know their customs, the individual 
weavers, and the changes that modernity and 
globahzation have made in their lives. My senior thesis 
in environmental studies has grown out of these 
experiences and focuses on the history, cultural ecology, 
and modern adaptations of the Aymara and their textiles. 



r do not. I i , 



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Julie Yeterian '06 

Michael Sargent, Psychology 
Meaninglessness on the Cosmic Scale: Does 
Insignificance Salience Affect Defense of 
CulturalWorldviews ? 

Based on terror management theory (TMT; Greenberg, 
Pyszczynski, & Solomon, 1986) much research has 
established a causal connection between mortality 
salience — reminders of one's own unavoidable death — 
and a variety of methods of defending cultural 
worldviews, or socially created conceptions of reality. 
The present studies were designed to determine whether 
recognition of one's personal insignificance in relation 
to the immensity of the universe can also affect defense 
of cultural worldviews. Two studies were conducted to 
examine the difference in cultural worldview defense 
between participants who had been reminded of personal 
mortality, insignificance, or the experience of dental 
pain (control), as measured through 1) polarization in 
judgments of individuals who threatened or bolstered 
particular cultural worldviews; and 2) the explanation 
of stereotype-inconsistent and stereotype-consistent 
behaviors. 

Benjamin Yoon '06 

Nancy Kleckner, Biology 

Physiological and Pharmacological Characterization 
of Glutamate Receptors on B5 and B19 Buccal 
Ganglion Neurons of Helisoma trivolvis 

Gastropod mollusk feeding is directed by a cyclical 
pattern generating neuronal circuitry. The snail, 



®. 



Helisoma trivolvis, feeds in three phases, and three distinct 
intemeurons in the buccal ganghon control each phase of 
feeding. Glutamate appears to be a primary signaling 
molecule for some of these feeding intemeurons, and 
previous evidence suggests the presence of both excitatory 
and inhibitory receptor populations on the follower neurons 
(B5, B19). In this project, these unidentified receptor 
populations are being studied by isolating B5 and B19 
neurons from Helisoma buccal ganglia, and recording 
response to glutamate and other receptor agonists in the 
presence and absence of pathway inhibitors. These 
experiments will contribute to our knowledge about 
receptor types responsible for the control of mollusk 
feeding by glutamate. 

Jin Zhang '06 

T. Glen Lawson, 
Chemistry 

Evaluation of the Role of 
the N-terminal Amino 
Acid in HA V3C Protease 
Susceptibility to 

Ubiquitination 
The ubiquitin ligase E3- 
alpha is part of the 
pathway for selectively 
targeting N-end rule 
protein substrates for 
ubiquitination. Typically 
characterized as having 
basic or hydrophobic N- 
terminal amino acids, 

these proteins are Perry Atrium 

subsequently degraded by the 26S proteasome complex. 
We have shown that while the HAV 3C protease lacks a 
destabilizing N-terminus, it is recognized by E3-alpha via 
an internal destruction signal of ten amino acids. To 
furtherunderstandE3-alpha-substrate interaction, we have 
evaluated the effects of a mutated HAV 3C protease N- 
terminal amino acid on 3C protease susceptibility to 
ubiquitination. We measured the inhibitory effects of 
purified N-terminally mutated HAV 3C protease proteins 
on the ubiquitination of radio-labeled wild type 3C protease 
in an in vitro system. Findings from preliminary studies 
suggest that while mutating the 3C protease N-terminal 
serine to phenylalanine does not affect ubiquitination 
susceptibility, 3C protease with an N-terminal serine to 
arginine mutation is a better substrate for ubiquitination 
then the wild type protein. 



Oliver Wolf '06 

John Baughman, Political Science 

Voter Mobilization, Public Opinion on Abortion, and 

the 2000 Presidential Election Campaign 

Abortion attitudes have played a pivotal role in American 
politics throughout the twentieth century. The way abortion 
has been framed — whether women should have the right 
to intentionally terminate a pregnancy — has been a 
determining factor for American public opinion. 
Moreover, there is arguably a causal relationship between 
public attitudes on abortion and political activism. That 
causal relationship underlies the central focus of my 
senior thesis: to explore how, and to what extent, abortion 
attitudes mobilize citizens to vote and advocate for voting, 
using the 2000 presidential election as a case study. By 

presenting 
independently 
tabulated public 
opinion data, 

including tables and 
graphs on variables 
related to abortion, 
voter advocacy, 
partisanship, and 
religiosity, I 

demonstrate that 
abortion attitudes 
have a relative effect 
on heightened 

political activity. 
Furthermore. I show 
how the 2000 
campaign's political 

context illustrates aspects of the political process when 
activity on abortion is particularly salient. 

Nathaniel Stambaugh '06 

Matthew Cote, Chemistry 
Electron Waves in Nanoparticles 

In the last ten years it has become possible to fabricate 
highly symmetric structures called 
"nanoparticles." This term implies that the dimensions are 
on the order of one thousand times smaller than the width 
of a human hair. The interaction of these particles with 
visible light has many applications, so it is of fundamental 
importance to understand what is happening on the level 
of the nanoparticle. This poster presents a survey of 
models used to describe this behavior, including a model 
that describes a sea of electrons whose oscillations interact 
strongly with light. 







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MEN'S 




■ Head Coach: Joe Reilly; Assistant Coaches; 

Tim Kane, Steve Milks, JonFurbush: Captauis: 
\ Sean Cahill, Zak Ray. 

JPtiomas Kothe, Zak Ray, John Lattimer, Bryan i 
\ Wholey, Sean Cahill, Eric Shone, Scott Place, 
I Damon McGinn, Pat Halloran, Matt Chudomel . 

■ Sam Taylor, Rob Stockwell, Ben Thayer, 
nthony Begon, Mark Westhuis. 




' ' 



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WOMEN'S 



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-"athletic cc -« ■• 



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1 i 4 



Head Coach: lim Murphy; Assistant Coached: 

;!arla Flaherty: Captains: Meg Coffin and Annie 
liting 

Becca Buckler, Sarah Barton, Maggie 

Mary Hart, Kyla Decato, Jackie P| 

Beckwith, Li 

ShawnRose 

Franklin, Katy Kerkian-Winton, Annie 



'-^'^ ''•■ '- 



',.:<.^.'X'y.7.iu. '-, 



The 2005-2006 Season 



In March 2006, Bates head coach Joe Reilly was named Coach of the Year and juniors Zak Ray and Rob Stockwell each made 
the All-NESCAC Second Team for the second year in a row as postseason honors were announced for men's basketball 
Wednesday by the New England Small College Athletic Conference.During the same month, the Eastern Collegiate Athletic 
Conference has named Bates College center Meg Coffin a 2006 ECAC First Team All-Star, the conference announced on 
Wednesday. Also, LEWISTON, Maine — D3Hoops.com named Bates College junior Meg Coffin to its All-America Fourth 
Team and the Women's Basketball Coaches of America named her an Honorable Mention All-America, making Coffin the 
second female athlete ever at Bates to win All-America honors in two completely different sports. 

In April 2006, Bates men's basketball coach Joe Reilly was named Coach of the Year, and juniors Zak Ray and Rob Stockwell 
each were voted First Team All-State, as the Maine Men's Basketball Coaches Association postseason awards were announced 
Monday. 





The 2005-2006 Season 

In October 2005, Bates College senior Dan Johnson (Detroit Lakes, Minn.) finished fifth overall and earned All-NESCAC First 
Team honors, leading Bates men's cross country team to ninth place at the NESCAC Championships at Wesleyan University. 
Also, junior Kathryn Moore (Pelham, N.H.) finished 16th overall to lead the Bates College women's cross country team at the 
2005 NESCAC Championships at Wesleyan University. Bates accumulated 229 points, ahead of Hamilton (298) and Trinity 
(311). 

In November 2005, Bates College's women's cross country team finished 13th out of 41 teams at the NCAA New England 
Regional Championship, hosted by Springfield College. With 376 points, the Bobcats were a shade behind MIT (360) for 12th. 
Williams won the team tide, followed in succession by fellow NESCAC programs Colby, Amherst, Middlebury and Tufts. Bates 
senior Dan Johnson (Detroit Lakes, Minn.) placed 13th at the NCAA Division III men's cross country championships at Ohio 
Wesleyan University, becoming the 12th man to achieve Ail-American status. 







il) 



WOMEN'S 



'>^%*:-.H 




i^TES 




FIELD 



1 




The 2005-2006 Field Hockey Season 

In September 2005, field hockey fell to Amherst in their conference opener with 2- 1 . The team falls to 0-2 on the season, while 
the Lord Jeffs improve to 3-0. During the same month, sophomore Erin Chandler (Thornton, P. A.AVesttown School) scored 
the game-tying goal and the game-winning goal for the Bates field hockey team to earn their first win of the season. 

In October 2005, the Bates College field hockey team's season came to an end in the first round of the NESCAC playoffs, 
with a 3-0 loss to No. 2 seed Middlebury at Kohn Field. 

In November 2005, Bates College senior forward Brooke Anable (Holderness, N.H.) was honored as an all-conference 
second team selection by the New England Small College Athletic Conference. 



FOOTBALL 




!oach: Mark Haniman; Assistant C( 

Capone, C.J. DeMatteo, Joe DeMatteo, Adam Lane, Steve 
Vashel, Craig Vandersea, Jeff Vartabedian; Captains^ 
Joe McDerniolt, Jason Moody, John Pambianch. 

Jason Moody, Adam Kayce, Peter Aiello, Andrew Isaacson 
Jason Starrett, Cory Pattison, Tyler Schmelz, Casey 
cConnack, Kevin Reyes, Dylan MacNamara, Dave 
hilbrook, Brandon Colon, Jason Godsell, Anthony Arger 
^h Demma. Shawki White, Greg Thornton, John Fox 
an Pamell, Mark Flaherty, Ron DiGravio, Steve 
Lattanzi. Ryan Mullin, Adam Poplaski, Jamie Walker 
man Peeke, Claudeny Obas, Anthony Begon, Dave 
Raymond, Andy St. James. Ryan Wimberly, Todd 
Ross Ingham. Brian Machunski, Mike LaButti, Matt 
MacKenzie. Terence Ryan, Tim Casey, Eric Obeng, Chris 



The 2005-2006 Football Season 

Bates opened their 2005 season with a 47-0 home loss to three-time defending conference champion Trinity at Garcelon Field. 

In November 2005, junior DE Terence Ryan made eight tackles, 2.5 of them for a loss, in Bates' 34-20 victory at Hamilton 
College. Ryan also forced two fumbles and had two quarterback sacks, raising his league-high total to 10.5, the highest total 
the NESCAC has seen since Wesleyan's Eric Mangini registered the same number in 1993. 

During the same month, junior defensive end Terence Ryan made All-NESCAC first team, and was joined on the second team 
by senior linebacker Dave Bodger, senior offensive tackle John Pambianchi, and junior wide receiver Dylan MacNamara. 



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^'OBCATf 



BASEBALL 



read Coach: Craig Vandersea 

Kyohei Yamada. Adam Kayce, Rob Schiiler, 
Tyler Paul, Adam Taranto, Adam Worrall, 
Rick Fraire. Derek DiGregorio, Dan 
Bousquet, Griffin Finan, Simon Griesbach, 
Sean VanderVliet, Ralph Vitti. Donovan 
Driscoll, Pat Grater, Erik Hood, Brian 
Mahoney, Denis Hogan, Brian Buckley, Alex 
Egeleson, Alex Maulucci, John Ribas, Nate 
Reid, Casey McCormack, Marco Charmella, 
Pete Meisel, Mike Kinsman, Charlie^ 
Engasser, Damon McGinn. 



v^ 



IB 



The 2005-2006 Baseball Season 

In March 2006, the Bates College baseball team plated seven runs combined in innings five and six, then held off a last-inning 
rally to defeat Elms College in Bates' season opener. 

In April 2006, Tufts University baseball team pounded out 32 hits while defeating Bates College in both ends of a doubleheader. 
completing a decisive three-game weekend sweep in NESCAC action with victories of 13-3 and 10-1 . During the same month, 
sophomore SS Brian Mahoney hit a two-out, two-run, go-ahead single in the bottom of the seventh inning and the Bates College 
baseball team went on to defeat visiting Fisher College 5-2 at Leahey Field. 

In May 2006, the Bates College baseball team lost both ends of a doubleheader against host Fisher College, 4-3 in the first game 
and 5-2 in the second, to finish the season at 13-21. 





The 2005-2006 Golf Season 

In September 2005, newcomer Jake Cox (Sammamish, WA/Lakeside School) led the way with a 79, to lead Bates to a sixth 
place finish at the State of Maine Golf Tournament. During the same month, the Bates golf team took home the Colby-Bates- 
Bowdoin title for the second time in three years. Junior Dana Lee (New York, N.Y./Chapin) finished 35th overall and first 
year Katherine O'Connor (S. Loudenville, N.Y./Emma Williard finished 38th overall out of a field of 78 golfers at the 
Invitational 

On October 1 " 2005, the Bates golf team surged to fifth place the first day of the two-day New England Small College Athletic 
Conference championships with a team total of 319. Also, throughout October 2005, sophomore Jake Cox led the Bates golf 
team to a seventh-place finish at the 2005 NESCAC championships. The Bates College Bobcats posted a score of 14 under 
par 56 to win the annual five-man USM Scramble, played at Sable Oaks Golf Club in South Portland, Maine. Led by sophomore 
Alex Jacobson (Newton. Mass.), the Bates golf team to 2 1 st place among Division III teams at the New England Intercollegiate 
Golf Association Championship, ahead of some Division I competition. 



® 



MEN'S 




lead Coach: Peter Lasagna; Assistant Coaches: Rogan 
]^onnell, Jeff Vartabedian; Captains: Dan Ross, Pete 
riedman. 



'aul Kazarian, Brent Morin, Mike Medeiros, Will Paddock 
^ory Baldini, Nathan Kellogg, Amadi Cisse, Ithai Schori, 
^att Erisman, Pressly McCance, Peter Boston, Craig 
Make. Will Akie, Chris Cruise, Ned Welbourn, James 
ialsch, Zach Kornfeld, Brenton Pitt, Bryan Frates, Wes 
Couture, Gabriel Belsky, John Adams, Max Cutchin, Tom 
D'Connor, Josh Goldfarb, Les Wade, Ryan O'Connor. \ 
iJ. Majeski, Matt Knortz, Peter Webber, Jeremy Grant, 
David Pritchard, Tom Lucey, Will Morse, Sean O'Brien, 
ohn Kinnane, John Bay, Mike Henry, Will Randi. Justin 
Jimon, Chase Larson, Matt Berg, Gregory Nelson. 








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BATES 



BJCtES , BATES , BMES 



I i \S .il3i 5 .15 




Head Coach: Brett Allen; AssisU 
Coaches: Amanda Wynn, CJ. DeMatteo;] 
Captains: Shannon Tully, Katie Unger^^ 

Shannon Tully, Katie linger, A 1 i s 
Emery, Sarah Young, Cara Sweeney, j 
Meredith Miller, Elizabeth Denver, 
Danielle Cormier, Sonija Parson, Jeanne 
|Othrop, Molly Wagner, Jen Pflanz,| 
ler, Lauren Kruck. Hani 
j1 Harmeling, Sarah 



Piazza, Julie Bennan, Meg Coftni, Rachel Greenwood. Caroline Thomas, Elise Kornack, Katie Smarse, 



HSIHuImI 



In May 2006, the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association has announced that Bates College senior defenseman 
Ryan O'Connor is an STX/USILA Honorable Mention All-America selection. 

In June 2006, the Bates College women's lacrosse team was one of 35 squads named a 2006 Honor or Merit Squad by 
the Intercollegiate Women's Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA), while three Bobcats were included among 1 15 
student-athletes on the IWLCA Division III Academic Honor Roll. 



ALPINE 





NORDIC 



|# ^ 



\ -. c*- I ~ 



/ '^' 



Head Coach: Becky Woods; Assis^lil 
Coaches: Kat Bennett, Bob Flyni 
Captains: Seth Hubbard, AlissaPraggasti| 

Haleigh Aimstrong, Megan Arnold, Mart j 

Benes, Connor Cushman, Matt Dunlaf 

Sylvan EUefson, Will Gardner, Gretche 

Grebe, Seth Hubbard, Lauren Jacobs. Ds 

[Johnson, Kaitlyn McElroy, Dylan MogJ 

Steve Monsulick, Emily Poole, 

^Praggastis, John Reuter, Nicole Rif 

iKyle Rogers. Meghan Somers. Tim Whitoi 



2005-2005 Alpine and Nordic Skiing 

In January2006, the Bates College men's and women's Nordic ski teams each stood in sixth place at the conclusion of the 
classic sprints, the first day of the Colby College Winter Carnival at Sugarloaf USA. 

In February 2006, the Bates College women's alpine ski team placed fifth in the slalom to help the Bates ski teams to sixth 
place among 1 1 teams at the Middlebury College Winter Carnival. During the same month, the Bates College men's Nordic 
ski team placed fourth out of 1 1 teams in the 1 OK Classic to notch the Bobcat ski teams' best effort at the Middlebury College 
Winter Carnival. 

In March 2006, the Bates College ski teams came in 12th place overall at the conclusion of the NCAA Championships, 
ihe Bobcats' best team finish at NCAAs since 1998 and the second best among traditionally Division 111 schools. 




MEN'S 



1 




Head Coach: Andrew Carter; Assistant Coaches: 

Anne Lewis, Eliot Pitney, Ryan Sparks, Kristen 
Andersen; Kacey Houston; Captains: Nate Hubbeil 
stin Streen. 






'im Austin, Charles Biddle, Jon Blanchard, 
Matthew Boiler, Dylan Eberle, Christian Ford, 

*rew Hagstrum, Timothy Henderson, Colin 
pllister, Nathaniel Hubbeil, Eugene Kim, Ian 
imball, Brian Klein, Ben Linder, Matthew 
Martone, Sam Milstein, Matthew Morgan, Brian 
Quarrier, Matthieu Riviere-Platt, Kyle Rogers, Brad 
Sherman, Justin Streen, Bill Walsh, I-Hwei Warner, 
Sam Werbel -Sanborn. 




56. 




WOMEN'S 



mm 




The 2005-2006 Rowing Season 

In May 2006, Bates College senior rower Megan Germscheid was named a Division II/III National Scholar-Athlete by 
the Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association. Throughout the same month, the Bates College women's varsity climbed 
to the seventh position in the final Division III rankings released by U.S. Rowing and the Collegiate Rowing Coaches 
Association. Meanwhile, men's varsity eight finished fourth among NESCAC crews in the season-ending EC AC 
Championships. 

In April 2006, the Bates College crew earned the 2006 Presidents' Cup with 21 cup points at the CBB Regatta on the 
Androscoggin River. Colby College was second with 16 points, followed by Bowdoin with nine. 




f 



MEN'S 



1 




The 2005-2006 Soccer Season 

In December 2005, Bates College junior defender Meg Coffin was named NSCAA Second Team All-America, while she 
and teammates Kim Alexander and Molly Wagner were named to the New England All-Region team. During the same 
month. Bates College women's soccer players Meg Coffin, Kim Alexander and Molly Wagner had additional honors come 
their way, as all three were named All-New England by the New England Women's Intercollegiate Soccer Association. 

At the end of 2005, Bates College men's soccer players Terence O'Connell and Brent Morin were named to the Division 
III New England East All-Region team by the National Soccer Coaches Association of America. At the beginning of 2006, 
the Bates College men's soccer team was one of 65 programs across the country to be awarded the Men's Collegiate Team 
Academic Award from the National Soccer Coaches Association of America for the 2004-05 academic year. 



58^ 




WOMEN'S 




MEN'S 



!^oach: John lllig; Assistant Coadu 

)n Chapin, Chris Foster, Peter Goldsboroif 
ill, Dmitri Russell. Marc Tagsart, Rick} Weij 



SjO^ft 




The 2005-2006 Season 

In January 2006, the Bates College men's squash team had an eventful and productive weekend at the Yale Round Robin, with 
four easy victories over traditionally close rivals including Denison, Navy and Hobart, a shutout loss to powerhouse No. 4 
ranked Yale, and a crushing 3-6 loss to rival Franklin & Marshall College. This month the team saw Ricky Weisskopf s first 
loss of the season, against the No. 2 player in the country from Yale. 

In February 2006, the Bates College men's squash team lived up to its seeding and beat Bowdoin one more time on Sunday, 
7-2, to earn 13th place in the final team rankings in the College Squash Association. 

In March 2006, Bates College sophomore Ricky Weisskopf (San Salvador, El Salvador) won his first match at the College 
Squash Association Individual Championships at Amherst College, cementing his All-America status for the second straight 
year. 



60/ 



f\ 



WOMEN'S 



The 2005-2006 Season 



The Bates College women's squash team started its 2005-06 regular season in style at Wesleyan University, sweeping both 
Stanford University and Middlebury College by 9-0 scores. 

In January 2006, the Bates College women's squash team, rated 10th nationally by the College Squash Association rankings, 
had little trouble dispatching in-state rival Colby College for the ninth straight match at the Bates Squash Center, 9-0. 

In Februarie 2006, the Bates College women's squash team scored an upset 6-3 victory over Cornell University to claim ninth 
place at the College Squash Association Howe Cup Team Nationals at Harvard University. 

In March 2006, Bates college junior Kelsey Engman and senior Melissa Lue Yen each won their first-round matches at the 
College Squash Association Individual Championships at Amherst College, placing them among the top 48 players in the 
nation this year. 




r 



MEN'S 



SWIMMING & DIVING 




The 2005-2006 Season 



At the end of 2005, the Bates College men's and women's swimming and diving teams each received personal-best 
performances en route to victories over NESCAC rival Trinity College. The Bates men downed Trinity 161-123, while the 
Bates women won 178-121. 

In January 2006, the Bates College men's and women's swimming and diving teams each came away victorious in their first 
road trip of the season at Babson College. The Bobcat men defeated the host Beavers 1 1 1 -96, and the women were 1 30-98 
winners. 

In March 2006, Bates College first-year diver Kelsey Lamdin had a breakthrough performance at the NCAA Division III 
championships, placing sixth in the 3-meter platform competition to claim All-America honors. 

In April 2006, Bates College's men's and women's swimming and diving teams were each named Academic Ail-American 
Teams for the Fall 2005 semester by the College Swim Coaches Association of America. 



62. 




WOMEN'S 



SWIMMING & DIVING 




k<r>. 



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6^ 



MEN'S 




WOMEN'S 




The 2005-2006 Season 



At the end of 2005, spurred by a nationwide call to action from the tennis programs at Louisiana State University, Bates 
College men's and women's tennis teams organized a clothing drive to be held on campus. 

The Bates College men's tennis team started its 2006 spring season with a swing into Texas, where the Bobcats lost to 
Trinity University 6-1 on Feb. 21 and to Division II University of the Incarnate Word 6-3 on Feb. 23. 

In May 2006, Bates College seniors Will Boe-Wiegaard and Tristan Beach have each been named to the All-NESCAC 
Men's Tennis First Team. Boe-Wiegaard is All-NESCAC in both singles and doubles, while Beach has made the team as 
a doubles player.During the same month. Bates College senior Will Boe-Wiegaard returned to the championship match 
of the NCAA Division III Men's Tennis Singles Championship for the second straight year. 



0i 



MEN'S 



TRACK & FIELD 




The 2005-2006 Season 



In March 2006, senior Adam Macbeth (Ellsworth, Maine) earned the 26th indoor track and field All-America honor in Bates 
College history, and Bates' first ever in a hurdle event at the NCAA Indoor Championships, St. Olaf College. 

In May 2006, the Bates College men's track and field team scored 29 points to finish the EC AC Outdoor Track & Field 
Championships in a tie for eighth place out of 54 scoring teams at Springfield College. 

The Bates College women's track and field team won honors as a 2006 Division III USTFCCCA Women's All-Academic Team. 
Additionally, two team members, Ashley Wentworth '06 and Kathryn Moore '07, were named to the 2006 Division III 
USTFCCCA Women's All-Academic Track and Field Team. In June 2006, Bates College graduate Liz Wanless "04 finished 
third for the second straight year in the women's shot at the USA Track and Field Outdoor Championships in Indianapolis. 



66, 




WOMEN'S 



TRACK & FIELD 




SOFTBALL 




The 20O5-2CO6 Softball Season 

In March 2006, the Bates College softball team finished up its season-opening trip to Florida by splitting two games for the 
third time in three days. Bates defeated Norwich University 6-2, before losing to the College of Wooster 9-6. 

In April 2006, Wesleyan University beat Bates College softball team in both ends of a doubleheader. putting the Bobcats back 
at the .500 mark with a four-game losing streak. The Cardinals won Game 1 by an 8-1 score, and Game 2 by a 7-6 score. 

In May 2006, Bates junior centerfielder Katie Franklin was named to the All-NESCAC Softball First Team for the second 
straight season, highlighting a trio of Bobcats receiving all-conference recognition. Senior first baseman Kyla Decato and first- 
year Stacia Saniuk were both Second Team selections, and Saniuk was named Rookie of the Year.During the same month, 
junior outfielder Katie Franklin was selected a 2006 New England Division III Second Team All-Star by the New England 
Softball Coaches Association, her third postseason award that month. 



68. 



VOLLEYBALL 




The 2005-2006 Volleyball Season 

In October 2005, Colby College won the Sept. 30-Oct. 1 Bates Invitational volleyball tournament, 4-0, with senior Cait 
Cleaver, 57 kills and 60 digs in four matches, who was voted the tourney's Most Outstanding Player for the second year 



\n a row. 



Later during the month. Bates College volleyball team outlasted host and NESCAC rival Bowdoin College in five games 
on a Friday night, 30-25, 24-30, 30-23, 28-30, 15-12, snapping the Bobcats' seven match losing streak. The Bates College 
volleyball team won its second straight match at Williams College, defeating Hamilton College in straight games, 30-20, 
30-28, 30-27. 




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AMANDLAt's primary function is to 


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meet the needlii^ Mncan-American 
students and those o^frican descent. 
By so d^lpg, it hq^s t<f^eighten 


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black awareness ^mQUcI cainpus and 


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<W Ah •uri •*iri 

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in the surroiQ^ng cqgsm^aity. The 
organiza7fc#h brings usues and 
programs of global amd societal 
importance to campus, focusing on 
the rich lives and cultures of people of 
African descent. j 


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The purpose of BCF is to encourage and equip students 
to follow Jesus Christ a^^rd. W^trive to grow in love 
for God and God's peQ|pel^ev||^^mnicity and culture, 
and to come to a deeper unSSerstanding of the scripture 
and God's purpo|pp6%i the world. We gfjginize various 
small groups tSat usually mee^jupe^ajy for bible study, 
discussion of fcertinent issues, 6r piJ^r. 'Of^ere are also 
weekly Wedn^day night meetings for a tlrae of worship , 
sharing, and t^BBI^^. Various social adlwities are held 
throughout the yfar — ^for relationship and community 
building, and oftei^mes just for fmi! Just this past 
semester, we had a^|-smashin^event to raise money 
for charity. Our activities^are always open to the entire 
Bates Community. BCF is associated with InterVarsity 

Christian Fellowship. 









o<ii:iiii:u 





^ ^ 



Wendell Phillips ol|pe|(^Rhat "Eternal 
vigilance is the price of liberty. ' The BCLU 
maintaiiifthat vigil bvprornotin^aware- 
ness atiout, and-activi^ civil 

liberties both at Qiites, and at large! To do 
this, the BCLU engages in advocacy and 
organizes kctures, panels, ^d discus- 
sion meetinss to generate discourse and 
greater awareness of civil liberties. 



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The BATES COLLEGE STtn^atT GCWERNMKNT is the student 
government of Bates College. It consists of two branches: the 
Representative Assembly (RA) and the Executive Council (EC). The 
RA consists of el^ff^d representatives from every clal^fflld housing 
unit. The EC consists of the presidjpit, Mce presidents, trea^rer, and 
a representatwe from each adviSjOjy-Gommittee. At weekfc^ public 
meetings, the entire BCSG actrfas representatives of tlm student 
population, voicing concerns and support, engaging in advocacy, and 
articulating student interests. This continues outside the weekly 
meetings throiigh the work of nearly thirty compiiuees. These 
committees determine policies in areas ranging ffom academics to 
parking, discipline to residential life, and much more. The BCSG also 
administers over $350,000 in Student Activities fu^ds, allocating the 
money amongst varicMs student clubs and organizations. 



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The Chase Hall Commitiee i 
nin.programmuig board on. 
a substantial bucket, i he^i 

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le primary, student 
>us. Working with 
LS, publicizes, and 
runs a variety of qJ|^ ov cr^1J^ .^BP^c of the yeai 
and into Short T^rlti>JFW5»tf^^ra^ a major music 
concert, a comedy ^yy^Twc ttalloween and 80's 
Dance, Big Prize BQQKuid the qpardination of the 
nation's 2nd oldest, ^mter CamiVaLl. This is a great 
way to interact witll the studen#body, learn event 
planning and marketing s^j31s, as well as getting 
your voice heard in the booking of campusi 
entertainment. 



78^ 



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The Crosstones is Bates' first ever co-ed 
a cappella groutLJUiterii^ their 9th year 
of existence. Tjg^i axe a Very talented, 
energetic ^d^^ftov u|^ with perfor- 
mances that amtl^TmBmi^ to be enter- 
taining, p'heif r^^^lpi^l^s expansive 
with songs by artists ranging from No 
Doubt ancPVIIilRed Hot (ffflnTPeppers to 
Ani DeFranco and Jann^Arden. The 
Crosstones a|£ current putting the 
finishing touches on tfieir second cd, 
which will make its debut in the late 
spring or early fall of 2005. 



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Debate and Bates are practically synonymous. 
Always among the top debating schools in the 
nation, Bates plagea fourth at the North American 
Championships m 1992. In pastf years, we have 
hosted the North Americans, feat|M|l|g the top 
debaters fi^m Can^d^ and ttie U.S. EN^bate is a 
great way to develop yoiur nlind|compet|s success- 
fully against the top schools in the coyitry, travel 
around the country and the world, ma have a lot 
of fun. No prior experience is nedkssary; some of 
our best debates started while at Bates. Come join 
us — it will change your life^^^ 



i:SS 



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The Bates Deju^ratsTaBi concerned 
students an^^mzens wIolo tend to 
vote for Bemocrats^ and ar^politi- 
cally acn^ a nd a ware. We ^onsor 
speakers, wdlk on€l^^o& campaigns, 
host fqrums and debates oi^^impus, 
and engagft in discussioni^^n hot 
political t^lcs. In joining lis, you can 
have an impact on the world beyond 



Bates. 



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EMOCRATS 




Coordinator: Sulochana Dissanayake 
Treasurer: Alana Kambury Secretary: 
Stephanie Howson Publicity Manager: 
Gretchen Grebe Bh)ent Manager: Cameron 
Seher 



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The BATES DHARMA SOCIETY was revived in Fall 05 by a 
handful of like-minded indwiduals^iterested in furthering 
their knowledge about l4||l|f5uddiMB|feachings & Buddhist 
practices. We meet weekly (Thursdays 5.30pm at the Multi- 
Cultural Centre) tCM|d|Jcuss/ organize evjp|fi and practice 
meditation. Our ma^i^ei^is the Annual CeleAation of Vesak 
(the birth, enlightenm^t ai|d passing away c» Lord Buddha) 
which is held during the Month of May. We host Buddhist 
monks from varidSS traditions and are alM!^ on the lookout 
for innovative means|to allow the Bates/ljpwiston Community! 
to nurture their intere^in Buddhism aa^Enlightenment. The 
Bates Dharma Society w^omes all jlkrespective of personalf 
beliefs/religious affiliations) to join this informal group to 
make friends, meditate or satisfy your curiosity about Bud- 
dhism! 



'•"7^^^ 



Bates BMSCEMERGENCV^AnB MEDICAL SER- 
VICED) is a great group of students who have all 
completed the Emergency Medical Technician's 
course whpre they learned how to provide emer- 
gency medical care to patients of all ages and 
needs, uites EMS member^ vomnteer their time 
to be "oif-call" for 24 hour shifts where they are 
ready to respond to any emergencies on campus 
where we use radios to commu4icate with our 
other crew niembers and Bates Security. We not 
only provide medical care to thc^ in need, but we 
offer many lectures and training sessions to keep 
our skills proficient. 



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^ 



Chief of Service: Emily Davie Deputy Chief: James Maldonls 
Captain: Danielle Rettinger Captain: Laura Cook 
Treasurer: Joseph Shulan Secretary: Megan Patey 
Supplies Officer: David Desjardins Infection Control: 
John Klummp General Member: Amanda Harrow 
Advisor: Scott Soucy 



President: Christine WoU Vice President: 

Jonathan Steuber Treasurer: Caroline 
Wick Secretary: Adra Greenstein 





/ 



BATES 



V 






The ENVIRONMENTAL COALITION focuses on improving envi- 
ronmental responsibility at Bates, within the local Lewiston- 
Aubum community, £^<^M|Mi^tioii||U|M^e. We work towards 
these broad goals throjM^^BLpai|^s on specific college poli- 
cies, education effortff'aihong students, aim by drawing atten- 
tion to crucial is^es Sutside of the Bates IduI^^'' Recently, 
for instance, w^^^ worked ^ blfcgtng cfea^^Hfcgy to Bates 
and pursued ^rious qpiipii^^M^S^IMg p corpora- 

tions such as Ford as%ell aR%n g^bmment polices like the 
Bush admin{^ation's attempt to open the .^ptic National 
Wildlife Refu^%ffiiiril drilling. Also, we are cuoa^nly organizing 
a panel discussionlln Maine's drinking wlfer. Next year, we 
hope to emphasize community building acflFities as well, such 
as a college garden J It is important to npCe that EC is nm by 
its members, and this np^^ t|iatflbw issues are always 
welcome. If you have other environmental projects that you 
are interested in come to a meeting and inform other members 
of your ideas; before you know it a new campaign will be kicking 
off. 



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The FEMINIS 
zation tha^jjptnotes 
advocating social, poll 




N is an organi- 

p^m^pnent by 

and economic equal- 

and awareness of 



ity throigh politii^ 

issues ftch as rep^^flnHi^e health, domestic 
abuse, and glol^ vglen's issues. We ain^ to study 
and take action on global, national, cailipus, and 
local fem11liiirk|sues and concerns, an9 to provide 
leadership aHpcareer building opi^rtunities for 
feminist sti^ents. We also try and educate the 
Bates community about feminists issues. 





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Co-Coordinators: Emily Katz, Ariel Childs 
Co-Campaign Coordinators: Emily Biliouris, 
Sara Culver Co-Treasurers: Chelsea Cook, 
Victoria "Tori" Finkle Secretary: Adrienne 
Maxwell 




Bassmasters: Jesse Robbins, John Nissen, 
Holy Mackerel Co-Treasurers: Thomas 
"Sawyer" Fahy, Andrew Foukal God of Cod, 
John Ritzo Master Baiter & Lurer Ekiuipment 
Manager: Machlas Schoen 



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le BATES FISHING CLUB was established in 1999 
for fishermen and fisherwomen in hopes of establish- 
ing a network of campus wide anglers. The BFC has 
equipment and supplies freej^vailable for all mem- 
bers and anyone else iriteresteain finding out what 
fishing is all ahoxft: good frierms-and good times. 
Our equipment room cover^^-all^shiilg needs from 
native brook trout fishing tc^nj^ft bifes surf casting 
to ice fishing fer pike. The 2005-2800 academic year 
held many succfessful trips for thfe club: Late-sum- 
mer striped bass fishin gont he Kennebec River as it 
drained into the ocean; Tall rainbow trout fishing onj 
the Kennebec in Gardiner; brook trout and land- 
locked salmon fishing on the Presumpscot; norther 
pike ice fishing on Sabattus Pond; and, lake trout 
fishing on Moosehead Lake to name a few. 



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<^e &lub6 (francophone, is the allnow (^ronch 
&luhat(^at6s(200^). ^t is a club not onl^ about 
(franco, but about (^ronch-speakin^ places all 
around the world including (Rwanda, ^Mauritius, 
oMartinicjue and (§1 uebec c^oin us as we explore 
(^francophone culture through food, music, and 
films Qf^ou don't even need to know how to speak 
(^rench tojoinl (3iven though we are a new club 
we had several successful events last pear including' 
fondue nights, c^rench dinners, cr e pe nights, a 
oM^ardi (^ras fundraiser dance, and even a trip 
to ^Montreal and <SluebecJ C^e wish our new 
&o- Presidents, 



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2005-2006 Officers: 

President: Natasha Mayet Vice President: 

Courteny Sargent Advisor: Mary Rice DeFosse 
Treasurer: Jacob Iselin Activities Coordinator: 

Jessica Dumas Secretary: Donna Rampersad 



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Led by a group of seasoned vets the hockey team 
compiled a 16-2-0 record for the season. They were 
the regular season NECHA champions and came in i 
second in the league's tournament. The Cats domi- 
nated their opponents throughout the year with 
solid defense and an overwhelmingly powerful of- 
fense. The team would like to thank its seniors 

forbeu^tte^S^s on 
an^cBPe ic 
ing their tenure' 
th^team, and 
ing sure the C^ will 
continue t(||iliomi- 
nate in the future. 







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^ackL-R: Asst Coach: Gary LaCasse, Rachel Kaplan, Sarah Jordan, Kailey Walsh, Galley 
-lorrison, Katie Nickerson, Laura Gook, Garlne Warsawskl, Amy Halter, Breana Milldrum, 
'aitlin Demko, Goach Roger Lachapelle Middle L-R: Arlee Woodworth, Hwei Ling Ng, Anna 
ikeele, Kate Hluchy], Yi Xing Hwa, Rebecca Kurish, Annie Mueller, Liana Schapiro FYont: 
^enee Dyer, Rashel Burton Captains: Kate Hluchyj '06, Anna Skeele '06, Laura Gook '07 
/Oach: Roger Lachapelle 



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BATES HILLEL creates a Jewish cultural 
community at Bates. We have weekly meeting where 
we plan, religious, cultural, social, and community 
service activities. We have Shabbat services and 
dinner together every Friday in the MC House. All, 
members of the Bates community are welcome at 
our events ! ^ - 



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The International Club provides the Bates community with 
an opportunity to take part in a large variety of activities 
that aim to promote and encourage cross-cultural awareness 
and understanding. Such activities include the annual In- 
ternational Dinner (featuring foods from around the world) , 
trips during the mid-semester breaks, several International 
parties, and our International Fair and Festival when stu- 
dents represent their countries in a variety of ways, ranging 
from fashion, to music, to dancing, to pictures, movies, and 
souvenirs. These activities serve as an opportunity for inter- 
national students to represent themselves, their countries, 
cultures, and traditions. Just as importantly, with our ac- 
tivities, we aim to create interaction that offers all students, 
from within the United States and from outside, the insight 
on various world issues; young 

ambitious people who 
share the same desire 
for knowledge, explora- 
tion, and education. We 
also serve to support the 
International students in 
their transition process 
from one part of the world 
to another. We welcome 
all members of the Bates 
Community as members 
of the International Club, 
or participants in its ac- 
tivities. 



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Co-Coordinators: Ashley Serrao, Kristofer Jonsson 

Treasurer: Muhammad "Saif Farooqui 

Secretary: Binit Malla Activities Coordinator: Jacob Isehn 

Publicity Director: Emily Crowley 

Advisor: James Reese 



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UGGLING CLUB 



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The Bates College JUGGLING CLUB meets weekly during the school year and on sunny, warm days adds 
color to the quad by performing outdoors with juggling clubs, balls, diabolos, poi, unicycles, and other! 
toys purchased with Club funds. The meetings are open to anyone, especially those with no juggling 
experience. Part of The Club's mission is not only to juggle together, but also to teach juggling skills and 
to introduce others to the joy of this ancient performance art. The Club regularly appears at all-Collegei 
events, such as Winter Carnival, and is frequently invited to give demonstrations and instruction for local! 
community organizations, such as the Boys Scouts or local schools. 




The MERIMANDERS is the student-run female a cappella group at Bates. We sing a 
variety of music genres, performing on campus and in the surrounding communities. We 
also tour other college campuses and host similar groups at Bates. Anyone 



/-'T^ interested in singing is welcome to join. 




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le a part of Bates' history! Whether you have 
^earbook experience or not, the MIRROR YEAR- 
lOOK needs your help. Help us take pictures, make 
lage layouts, and create a yearbook! 



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Since it's beginnings five years ago, Northfield remains the only non-auditioned singing group on 
campus. In addition to learning songs together every week, we have concerts, lead workshops a^ 
festivals, and go on fieldtrips. We sing a variety of traditional songs including Appalachian ballads, 
shape note songs, hebrew rounds, and sea shanties - just to name a few. Anything goes as lone 
as it's fun. We sing because we love it! , 




OUTfront serves the entire Bates community by sound- 
ing out fundamental issues of sexuality and gender. As 
both a student-run support group and a political 
organization, we facilitate education and discussion of 
gender and sexuality issues while working to change 
intolerant and discriminating attitudes. OUTfront co- 
operates with other student organizations toward the 
greater goal of social justice for all within, and beyond, 



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HYSICS 




President: Sorina Crisan 



The PHYSICS SOCIETY'S purpose is to advance and spread knowl- 
edge of physics to interested members of the Bates community. We 
sponsor weekly seminars, video viewings covering all areas of phys- 
ics and a weekly physics lunch (an informal gathering of physics stu-l 
dents and professors). 



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Co-Presidents: Michael Springer & 
Christine Woll Treasurer: Gregory 
Marcotte Archivist: Mariah Pfeiffer 
Majority Whip, Pluchino: Benjamin Chin 
Anthropologist: AlHson Caine Grand 
Poobah: Kyle Winborn Mix-Master K: 
Kathryn Rodden Diversity Coordinator: 
Matthieu Riviere-Platt Eye Candy: 
William Armstrong Coach in Residence: 
Kate Russell 



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SWIM CLUB 



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The BATES COLLEGE REPUBLICANS, a chapter of the Maine College 
Republicans and the College Republican National Committee (CRNC), is 
a political organization that promotes conservative values on the Bates 
campus and helps elect Republican candidates at the local, state and 
national levels of government. Club members host prominent speakers, 
engage in grassroots activism on behalf of Republican candidates, 
sponsor school-wide debates, and generally heighten political aware- 
ness at Bates. The club has a strong belief in the benefits of a strong two- 
party government and recognizes that every difference of opinion is not 
a difference of principle. 




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President: Nate Earle 
Vice President: Chris 
TheileMatch 



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TheileSocial Coordi- 
nator: Jon Gay 
Captains; Robert 
Emery, Andrew 
Jacobs 






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After being abandoned by their coach in the first week of the season, and losing several players to injury 
things did not look great for the Bobcats. However, the emotional drive from the cats allowed them to 
persevere and play well throughout the season. Raw strength in the pack and quick speed from the backs 
allowed powered the team through its games. The gentlemen ruggers held on their team motto, "Follow 
your HEART! For it is your heart that holds your passion, and it is your passion that drives you to play 
rugby!" 




WOMEN'S 



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UGBY 



starting top. left: 

Arlee Woodworth ("07): 
Renee Dyer (08): Elizabeth 
Lydon ("08); Di Akiyama ("08): 
Allie Earon ('09): Maddie 
O'Brien ('08): Siena Calabro 
('06): Christine Chmura ('06| 
Sabrina Miess ('09): Breana 
Milldrum ('08): Jaclyn Smith 
('07): Ariane Waldstein (08): 
Kim Nelson ('08): Amelia 
Hopkins ('08): Juha Swartz 
('08) : Joanna Good ('06) : Lisa 
McClellan ('09): Alex Hoover 
('09): Sam Farrell (coach) 
Elizabeth March ('09): Sasha 
Rice ('09): Elise Ogden ('09) 
Afton Pavleti ('08): Emily 
Fisken ("06): Mary Beth Lee 
(06); Lauren White (06): 
Tracey Begley ('06): Sarah 
Wilson ('06): Kristen Fries 
('07): Julie Knopf ('08) 



The WOMEN'S RUGBY TEAM finished 3rd overall in New England for Division 2; the best women's rugby has 
ever done in its history. We beat Colby and Bowdoln (twice) and also won our Conference (the Downcast Confer 
ence) for the second year in a row, this year going undefeated. We lose 9 influential seniors but have many 
talented returning players who will be able to step up continue the success of the women's rugby club. 



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Coordinator: 

V'oongi "Ginny" Yang 
Treasurer: Craig 
Angevine Co-Editors: 

Vanni Thach, Jordan 
Williams, Jacqueline 
Smith, Erin Reed, David 
Rosenzweig, Craig 

Angevine, Michael Jangl 

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The SEED MAGAZINE is an open forum where com- 
munity members in Lewiston and at Bates can ex- 
change, inform, resist, express, explore voice, rebel, 
question, grow love, communicate... Seed Magazine is 
raw, real, and rooted in respect... Seed Magazine is a 
priceless free literary magazine because when we plant 
a seed we are looking towards the future SEED. 



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J^RANGE 

.BEDFELLOWS 



From Left to Right: 
Dustin Drury, Lexi 
Kirsch, John Mulligan, 
Meg Joyce, AlexTeague, 
Laura Burns, Dylan 
Eberle, and Lee Spivak. 





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Bates' only improvisational comedy group, have been making people in the Northeast laugl 
for the last 10 years. The BEDFELLOWS perform a mix of long and short form improv weekl; 
on-campus, bring visiting groups from other colleges, professional troupes for workshops anc 
shows, and travel to such exotic locations as Boston and New Hampshire. Favorite event 
include the annual pre-finals show, the 12-hour charity fundraiser, Improv-a-Thon, and thi 
impending hot dog and cotton candy relay-eating contest. Yum! 



Co-leaders: 

Michael Wilson, 
Ben Reed, Sophie 
Nelson, and Rose 
Schwab 



TORYTELLING CLUB 



The STORRYTELLING CLUB gathers weekly to share stories around the week's theme. We have a rotatinc 
informal membership of people from many walks of life, including non-students and including people not directi 
affiliated with Bates, though they're harder to attract. We do oodles with our practice, and so much happens tha 
much goes by on a subconscious level. We aim to share emotions, make meaning out of experience, confoum 
social boundaries that normally keep us apart (and sometimes at odds); and to expand our imaginations. We hoh 
a retreat each semester to reflect on what we do and we bring guest speakers/facilitators to campus to inform tht 
lop \)ractice and the conversation. 




BATES 

TUDENT 



Mitor-In-Chief: Niraj Chokshi 
leputy Editor-in-Chief: Scott 
'riest and Emily Rand Business 
Manager: Marissa Johnson 
Managing Forum Editor: Thomas 
"lanagan Forum Layout Editor: 
Emily White Managing News 
\Editor: Kirsten Terry News Layout 
Editor: Eliza Reed Managing Arts 
Editor: Mari Wright Arts Layout 
Editor: T' Semester Patrick 
Lavender, 2"'' Semester: Louis 
Dennig Managing Sports Editor: 
John McNulty Sports Layout 
Editor: Kristin Faye Sahagian 
Photo Editor: Sarah Beck 





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ICome write for The Bates Student, the college's award- 
winning weekly newspaper. The paper is staffed and 
produced entirely by students. No prior experience is 
necessary to join. The Student is the campus' only 
'newspaper and maintains a circulation of about 2,500 
copies each week. 



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BATES ULTIMATE 
had a great 
winning 
Red Scare 
rival Bowdo: 
With cens( 
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celebrate 1993 
played ^k 
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yelled,and went FULL TILT, ol 
course. YEAH WHIP!! 



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BATES MEN'S ^^^ERPQLO welcomes 
members of the B?ffllcon1^ranity to engage 
them^selves in|what is knowrato many as 
"the hardest sport in the worlcf'. Operating 
without «oach, the team relies heavily on 
peer insLruction to foster experts from 
novices.! Both in the pool and out, the 
team encourages participants to stretch 
their physical limitations in all areas. 
Participation ^ers a much needed break 
from academia;*as well as friends and 
memories that will last a lifetime. 




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Co-Captains: Rich Hart, Stormont "Fisher" Qua Coach: Andrew Stowe 
Vice President: Matthew Harrington Co-Treasurers: Jesse Schoonmaker, 
Alexandra Teague Athletic Coordinator: Zachary Risler Pap Schmere: 
James Peckenham Notary Public: Daniel Berman Foreign Relations: Erik 
Baker Enforcer: Gregory Sinche 





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PRESroENT OF THE COLLEGE 

Elaine Tuttle Hansen 




i DEAN OF FACULTY 

Jill Reich 




DEAN OF STUDENTS 

Tedd R.Goundie 




DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Wylie Mitchell 



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Claudia Aburto Guzman, Marcus Bruce, Charles 
Carnegie, Margaret Creighton, Sue Houchins, Hilmar 
Jensen, John McClendon, Charles Nero, Carole 
Taylor 



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Lee Abrahamsen, Glen Lawson, Joseph Pelliccia, 
Paula Schlax, Bethany Whalon 



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Carol Dilley, Rachel Gantaume- Richards, 
GwYNETH Jones 



Lee Abrahamsen, William Ambrose, Gregory Ander- 
son, Pamela Baker, Ryan Bavis, Kathleen Claeer, 
Mary Hughes, Sharon Kinsman, Nancy Kleckner, 
Carolyn Lawson, Eli Minkoff, Karen Palin, Joseph 
Pelliccia, Stephanie Richards, Sonya Roderick, 
Rebecca Sommer, Robert Thomas 




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Rachel Austin, Gerald Bigelow, Jane Costlow, 
Holly Ewing, Lynne Lewis, Camille Parrish, James 
Richter, Peter Rogers, John Smedley, Rebecca 
Sommer, Thomas Wenzel 



Patricia Buck, Anita Charles, Anne Dodd, Holly 

GuRNEY, Stacy Smith 




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Marita Bryant, Gene Clough, John Creasy, Mathieu 
DuvALL, J. Dykstra Eusden, Beverly Johnon, Char- 
lotte Lehmann, Michael Retelle, Phaedra Upton 




Christopher Beam, Robert Bunselmeyer, John Cole, 
Margaret Creighton, Dennis Grafflin, Joseph Hall, 
Fiona Halloran, Atsuko Hirai, Steve Hochstadt, Hilmar 
Jensen, Michael Jones, Gwen Lexow, Karen Melvin, 
Elizabeth Tobin, Robert Williams 



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Grace Coulombe, Meredith Greer, David Haines, 
Melinda Harder, Pallavi Jayawant, John Rhodes, 
Shepley Ross, Caleb Shor, Bonnie Shulman, Eric 
TowNE, Peter Wong 



Cu\UDiA Aburto Guzman, Laura Balladur, Alexandre Dauge- 
Roth, Felicia Fahey, Baltasar Fra-Molinero, David George, 
Francisca Lopez, Yannick Montlouis-Felicite, Rafael 
Pacheco, Kirk Read, Mary Rice-DeFosse, Oscar Torres 
Duque, Richard Williamson 




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Marion Anderson, Dale Chapman, John Corrie, 
GiNA Fatone, Frank Glazer, William Matthews, 
James Parakilas, Kenneth Labrecque, Hiroya Miura, 
Rose Pruiksma, Thomas Snow, Shawn Thwaites 




David Aschauer, Wei Chen, Barry Farber, James 
Hughes, Britt Kirsner, Lynne Lewis, Margaret! 
Maurer-Fazio, Michael Murray, Michael Oliver, 
Smriti Rao, Carl Schwinn, Anne Williams 



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Janice Beaudoin, Scott Bennett, Denny Bourgoin, Edwin Capone, Carol Carpentier, Andrew 
Carter, Joseph Clough, Suzanne Coffey, Jennifer Collins, Rogan Connell, Carolyn Court, 
Carl DeMatteo, Samuel Farrell, Albert Fereshetian, Carla Flaherty, Robert Flynn, Nancy 
FouRNiER, Paul Gastonguay, Todd Goewey, Marsha Graef, David Haefele, Mark Harriman, 
Jennifer Hartshorn, WInifred Hohlt, John Illig, Seth Johnson, Peter Lasagna, Gwen Lexow, 
Michael McCollum, Dana Mulholland, James Murphy, Eliot Pitney, George Purgavie, Joseph 
Reilly, Richard Sirois, James Taylor, Craig Vandersea, Jeffrey Vartabedian, Steven Vashel, 
Michael Verville, Joseph Woodhead, Rebecca Woods 



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Gene Clough, Steven Konezny, Hong Lin, Mark 
NoRDBERG, Lawrence Powers, John Pribram, 
George Ruff, Mark Semon, John Smedley, Eric 
WoLLMAN, Gabriel Ycas 



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Robert Pallone, Sawyer Sylvester 



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Aslaug Asgeirsdottir, John Baughman, William 
Corlett, Olya Gayazova, Diane Haughney, Leslie 
Hill, Mark Kessler, Arlene MacLeod, Matthew 
Nelson, James Richter 



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Martin Andrucki, Robert Brito, Carol Dilley, 
Stephanie Kelley-Romano, Paul Kuritz, Christine 
McDowell, Justin Moriarty, Charles Nero, Kathleen 
Peters, William L. Pope, Michael Reidy, Katalin 
Vecsey 



ADMINI 




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Jane Bedard, Kristen Belka Rosenfield, Karen Caron, 
Jared Cash, Kristin Crosby, Karen Finocchio, Valerie 
Franks, Margaret Galligan, Dawna Hopkins, Karen 
KoTHE, Katherine Madden, Cathy McQuarrie, Wylie 
Mitchell, Deborah Obptande, Jason Patterson, Joseph 
Pelliccia, Sheila Walton, Leigh Weisenburger, 
Darlene Zupancic 



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Mariah Bumps, Sue Cook, Sarah Jones, Charles Kovacs, ' 
Mark Sheldon, Bonnie Trundy, Eileen Wisnewski, 
Michael Wisnewski 



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Kristen Andersen, Sandra Anthoine, Theresa Arita, Kathleen 
Arenault, Theresa Bailu^rgeon, Melody Beaulieu, Eileen 
Belleau, Marcella Bernard, Dennis Brown, Sean Campbell, 
David Chirayath, Marianne Cowan, Victoria Devlin, Lysanne 
Doucette, Donna Duval, Heidi Gagnon, Leah Gailey, Louie 
Geoffroy, Leigh Graham, Catherine Griffiths, Amy Haile, 
Kimberly Hokanson, Susan Hubley, Margo Knight, Mary 
Lambert, Elizabeth Limerick, Susan Meservier, Susan Michel, 
Elizabeth Nash, Chrystean Page, Robert Pallone, Alicia 
Richard, Tanisha Scottham, Elizabeth Sheppard, Christina 
Traister, Julie Walker, Darcy York 



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North Marshfield, MA 

Biology 



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Worcester, MA 
Biological Chemistry 



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Bryn Mawr, PA 

Anthropology/Religion 



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Oscar Z. Alcantar 

Avon, CO 

Anthropology 



Anthony G. Arger 

Reno, NV 

Political Science/Spanish 



Lindsay A. Allsop 

Concord, NH 

Art and Visual Culture 



Brooke E. Anable 

Holdemess, NH 

Art and Visual Culture 



Anna R. Anderson 

Carbondale, CO 

English 



Christine L. Anderson 

Boulder, CO 

Mathematics 











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Boston, MA 
Economics 




Hayley M. Anson 

Scarborough, ME 

English 




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Timothy B. Austin 

Chesterland, OH 

Economics 



Chase Hall 
1921 




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Thornton, NH 

Environmental Studies 



Ann M. Bartkowski 

Tonawanda, NY 

Biology 



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1913 




Lauren E. Bauder 

Durham, NH 

English 



John C. Bauer 

Concord, MA 

Economics 



Karina Bautista 
Quito, Ecuador 
Political Science 



Tristan M. Beach 
Grand Rapids, MI 
German/History 




Sarah E. Beck 

Scarsdale, NY 

English 



Christine O. Beckwith 

Worcester, MA 

Psychology 



Geoffrey Bedrosian 

Delmar, NY 

Biology 



Tracey B. C. Begley 
New York, NY 
Anthropology 




Gabriel J. Belsky 

Avon, CT 

Psychology 



Jenna K. Benson 

Watertown, MA 

Psychology 



Jacob S. Berkowitz 

Blue Hill, ME 

Political Science 



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Matthew J. Biggart 

Cheshire, CT 

History 




David K. Boakye-Danquah 

London, England 

Economics 



Connor W. Boyle 

Littleton, NH 

Philosophy 



Audrey L. Blanchette 

Marion, MA 
Art and Visual Culture 



Lindsy 1. Blazej 

Dixmont, ME 

Environmental Studies/Political 

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1857 



Erin E. Bragg 

Park City, UT 

Psychology 



Lindley L. Brainard 

Haddonfield, NJ 

Anthropology 



Maxwell G. Butler 


Carolina E.C. Salvioni 


Sean M. Cahill 


Aquinnah, MA 


Ciudad Del Este, Paraguay 


Dudley, MA 


Music 


Political Science 


Sociology 



Coram Library 1902 




William Boe-Wiegaard 

Easton, CT 
Biological Chemistry 




Jeff S. Bruson 
HoUis, NH 
Economics 




Siena L. Calabro 
Keene, NH 
Psychology 




Sean J. Caplice 

Duxbury, MA 

Economics 




Kathryn M. Clark 

Boise, ID 

History 



Anna K. Corliss 

Durham, NC 

Art and Visual Culture 



Devon P. Carroll 

Pepperell, MA 

Psychology 



Hathom Hall 1856 




Hedge Hall 
1892 



Christine A. Chmura 

Acton, MA 

French/Political Science 



John M. Chudomel 

South Wellfleet, MA 

Chemistry 




Meghan E. Cochrane 

Byfield, MA 

Biology 



Joel W. Colony 

Harrisville, NH 

Religion 



Chelsea M. Cook 

Gettysburg, PA 

Anthropology 




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Cranston, RI 

English 



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1964 



Mitchell A. Cote-Crosskill 
Fryeburg. ME 

History (_ "^ 



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Allison L. Coville 

Duxbury, MA 

Psychology 



Taryn A. Craig 

Hopkinton, NH 

English 



Dana Chemistry Hall 
1965 



Pettengill Hall 
1999 



lavora R. Daraktchieva 

Sofia, Bulgaria 

English 



Shelly Davgun 

Bemidji, MN 

Biology 



Jonathan D. DeCarlo 
Poland. OH 
Philosophy 



Kyla R. Decato 

Paris, ME 

American Cultural Studies 



Antonius M. DeSisto 

Portsmouth, RI 

Economics 



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Dave C. Desjardins 

Wallingford, CT 

Anthropology 



Kara J. Dietrich 

Grand Juntion, CO 

Sociology 



Erin V. Culbreth 

Montclair, NJ 

History 




Emily S. Davie 

Westwood, MA 

Biological Chemistry 





Hedge Hall 
1892 




Aarjan Dixit 

Kathmandu, Nepal 

Political Science 



Donovan C. DriscoU 

Braintree, MA 

Biology 



Dustin F. Drury 

Saranac Lake, NY 

Environmental Studies 



Jonathan W. Duchette 

Turner, ME 

Geology 



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Calcutta, India 

Mathematics/Physics 



Jessica M. Dumas 

Saco, ME 

History 



John H. Dunnigan 
Swampscott, MA 
Political Science 



Brian E. Dupee 

Alfred, ME 

Biology 






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1857 



Jessica A. Edgerly 

Arlington, MA 

Biology 



Christopher A. Eldridge 

Needham, MA 

Psychology 



Andrew G. Faller 

Hyattsville, MD 

Philosophy 




Thomas S. Fahy 

Carrabassett Valley, ME 

Physics 



Robert A. Farnsworth 

Metairie, LA 

Political Science 



Victoria J. Finkle 

Manchester, CT 

Economics 



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Mount Kisco, NY 

Philosophy 



Emily R. Fisken 

Thetford Center, VT 

Art and Visual Culture 



Margaret C. Forbes 

Boxford, MA 

Biology 



Nicholas W. C. Foster 

Ashland, OR 

French/Political Science 




Andrew E. Foukal 

Nahant, MA 

Physics 



Cynthia L. Freeman 

Cameron, AZ 

Interdisciplinary Studies 



Olin Arts Center 
1986 



Stephanie E. Garcia 

Newport, RI 

French 




Jennifer M. Gargiulo 

Boxborough, MA 

Interdisciplinary Studies 



Katherine M. Gatti 

Chelmsford, MA 

Sociology 



Diana M. Gauvin 

Portland, ME 

English 



Jonathan A. Gay 

Marblehead, MA 

Political Science/Spanish 




166, 



Adam C. Gemus 


Matthew R. Gerety 


Megan E. Germscheid 


Chase Hall 


Randolph, NJ 


White River Junction, VT 


Little Falls, MN 


1921 


History 


Psychology 


Biological Chemistry 





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Sam A. Golden 

Goldens Bridge, NY 

Neuroscience 




Peter G. Goldsborough 

Woods Hole. MA 

Philosophy 



Joanna M. Good 

Yarmouth, ME 

Psychology 




Subira M. Gordon 

Port Antonio, Jamaica 

History 



Lake Andrews 



Pettengill Hall 
1999 



Carolyn B. Greco 

Wellesley, MA 
Political Science 




Michael J. Greenway 
Mequon, WI 
Economics 



Amanda H. Grillo 

Studio City, CA 

Psychology 



Jacob O. Grindal 

Sedgwick, ME 

Economics 



Lisa C. Guy 

South Pasadena, CA 

Psychology 




Samuel A. Haaz 
Flourtown, PA 
Anthropology 



Benjamin W. Haley 

South Hadley. MA 

History 



Megan L. Hamilton 

Dover, NH 

English 



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Matthew C. Harrington 

Tucson, AZ 

English 



Amber F. Harris 

Durham, NC 

English 



Amanda E. Harrow 

Hopkinton, MA 

Psychology 



Todd A. Hawkins 

Augusta, ME 

History 




Meghan D. Helliesen 
Exeter, NH 
Psychology 



Marie J. Hemmelgarn 

Longmeadow, MA 

Psychology 



Keith B. Hengen 

Concord, NH 

Psychology 



Lindholm House 
1988 



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Kendall R. Herbst 

Greenwood Village, CO 

Philosophy/English 



Emily A. Hoffer 

Danville, VT 
Political Science 




Htay Min Hlaing 

Yangon, Myanmar 

Physics 



Kathleen J. Hluchyj 

Wellesley, MA 

French 







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Charles C. HoUister 

Pittsfield, MA 

Environmental Studies 



Dana Chemistry Hall 
1965 



Nathaniel B. Hubbell 

Yarmouth, ME 

History 




Yi-Xing Hwa 

Seremban, Malaysia 

Interdisciplinary Studies 



Dustin A. Jansen 
Weston, MA 
Economics 



Lane Hall 
1964 



annah E. Johnson-Breimeier 
Milwaukee, WI 
Sociology 



Office of Career Services 
Acquired 1970 



Charlene J. Impey 

St. Johnsbury, VT 

Anthropology 



Ross G. Inghcim 

Florence, NJ 

Psychology 




Anna C. Jarashow 

New York, NY 

Psychology 



Adam P. Jaskievic 

East Longmeadow, MA 

Interdis. Studies/Spanish 



Andrew M. Jennings 

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 

Mathematics 




Daniel V. Johnson 

Detroit Lakes, MN 

Biology 



Philip T. Johnson 

Hartford, CT 

Economics 




Stuart C. Johnson 

Laconia, NH 

Chinese 




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Margaret E. Joyce 

Winnetka, IL 

History 



Sarah E. Judice 

West Granby. CT 

Art and Visual Culture 



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Tiffany L. Kasper 

Weare, NH 

German 



Jonathan M. Kastoff 

Avon, CT 

Economics 



Lauren A. Kawana 

Honolulu, HI 

English 



Peter V. Keays 

Madison, NJ 

Environmental Studies/Political 

Science 



Chapel 
1914 



Rachel S. Kellar 

Kingston, NY 

Sociology ■ 



Zachary T. Kernan 

Shelburne, NH 

Economics 



Abigail M. King 

Hebron, ME 

English 



Roger Williams Hall 
1895 



170 



Julia E. Knight 

Chestertown, MD 

Art and Visual Culture 



Evan F. Kornack 
Dover, MA 
Economics 



Jeffrey A. Kotzen 

Chestnut Hill, MA 

Art and Visual Culture 



Hathorn Hall 
1856 




William J. Kenney 

Washington, D.C. 

History 




Nick M. Klinovsky 

University Park, MD 

Russian 




Heather M. Kromer 

Folsom, CA 

Biology 




Rebecca J. Kurish 

Sharon, CT 
French/Spanish 



Roger Williams Hall 
1895 



Matthew S. Lambek 

Montpelier, VT 

Music 



Wentworth Adams Hall 
1967 



Caliandra Lanza-Weil 

Portland, Oregon 

History 



The Quad 



Joel A. LeBel 
Poland, ME 
Philosophy 



Marina C. Langdon 

Phillips, ME 

Political Science 



Mary E. Lee 

Areata, CA 

Biology 



Rachael A. Levitz 

Lake Placid, NY 

Biological Chemistry 



Justin M. Lewin 

New York, NY 

Biology 



Andrea S. Lichtman 
Alfred. NY 
Psychology 





Benjamin P. Lebeaux 

Shrewsbury, MA 

English 




Pettigrew Hall 
1953 




Liiuliiolni House 
Acquired 1988 



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Alexis P. Lincoln 

Boxford, MA 

English 



Smith Hall 
1940 



Fei Liu 

Nanjing, China 

Economics 



Milliken House 
1906 




Thomas P. Lucey 

Easthampton, MA 

Economics/Physics 



Melissa A. Lue Yen 

Kingston 6, Jamaica 

Anthropology 



Aliza R. Luft 

Montreal PQ, Canada 

Interdisciplinary Studies 



Hannah G. Lund 

Northfield, MN 

Psychology 




Adam T. Macbeth 

Ellsworth, ME 

English/Interdisciplinary 

Studies 



Jonathan Z. MacMartin 
Wilton, NH 
Economics 



Denis C. Mahoney Jr. 

Waltham, MA 

Political Science 



William J. Majeski IV j 
Norwalk, CT ' 

Psychology 







Sasha Malik 

Haryana 122002, India 

Economics 



Margaret K. Mandeville 
Bedford, NH 
Psychology 



Megan M. Manning 

New London, NH 

American Cultured Studies 




Melisa M. March 

Montego Bay, Jamaica 

Political Science 



Daniel T. Masterson 

Gorham, ME 

Political Science 



Hedge Hall 
1892 



Lake Andrews 



Melissa A. Simones 
Greene, ME 
Psychology 



Molly J. Marquand 

Garrison, NY 

Environmental Studies 



James R. Maldonis 

Arlington, MA 
Biological Chemistry 




Cynthia A. Mauer 

Wayland, MA 

Economics 



Adrienne D. Maxwell 
Somers, MT 
Philosophy 



Omar D. Maxwell 

Springfield Gardens, NY 

Physics 




Sarah E. Mazur 

Winooski, VT 

Geology 



Sheridan C. McCafferty 

Millis. MA 

History 



Kristin M. McCurdy 

New Hartford, CT 

Geology 




Joseph J. M(l)(-iiiH)(l 

Walpole, MA 

History 



Kaitlyn R. McKechnie 

Wayzata. MN 

Japanese 



J. Sean McKenna 

Manchester, NH 

Psychology 



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John F. McNulty 

Green Harbor, MA 

History 



Ryan R. Mead 

New York, NY 

Political Science 



Dalia M. Mechanic 

New York, NY 

Psychology 



Sarah D. Mengel 

Westport, CT 

Religion 



Canham House 
Acquired 1981 



Elisabeth S. Moses 

Hamden, CT 

Biology 




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Portland, OR 

History 



Coram Library 
Built 1902 



Helen K. Minsky 

Brooklyn, NY 

Chemistry/Physics 



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Nicole H. Moraco 

Bedford, NY 

Biological Chemistry 



Matthew E. Moretti 

Hampden, ME 

Biology 



Takeshi Morita 

Tokyo, Japan 

Environmental Studies 



The College Chapel 
Built 1914 




Samuel M. Milder 

Pacific Paliades, CA 

Spanish 




Jason H. Moody 
Moody, ME 
Economics 




J. Brooks Motley 

Sherborn, MA 

Geology 




The Quad 



Carrie V. Murphey 

Nevada City, CA 

American Cultural Studies 



Chien Nakayama 

Tokyo, Japan 

Economics 



Michael K. Nelligan Jr. 
Rowley, MA 
Economics 




Zachary P. Mueller 

Lexington, MA 

Psychology 



Amanda M. Mullens 

Gill, MA 

Political Science 




Todd D. Myers 

Danvers, MA 

Psychology 



Hathorn Hall 
Built 1856 



Nicole G. Nadeau 

Shaker Heights, OH 

French 




Brendan C. Nangle 

Westport, CT 

Political Science 



Tanya J. Nauvel 

Grand-Baie, Mauritius 

Mathematics 



John C. Mulligan 

Gilford. NH 

English 




Michael S. Nelson 

Wareham, MA 

Political Science 



John J. Nissen 

Cumberland Foreside, ME 

Political Science 



Katharine M. Nolan 

Gladstone. NJ 

Biology 



r 




The Quad 



Toshiko Odaira 

Tokyo, Japan 

Biology 



Mark H. J. Osborne 

Stoughton, MA 

Sociology 



l>* £> 




Kathleen A. Nugent 

Buxton, ME 

Sociology 



Terence E. O'Connell 

Greenwich, CT 

French 



Ryan P. O'Connor 

Avon, CT 

Psychology/Economics 




Meghan C. ODowd 

Havertown, PA 

Psychology/East Asian Studies 



Caitlin H. Olmstead 

New York, NY 

History 



Brad S. Oriel 

Newton Centre, MA 

Neuroscience 




Christopher J. Palsho 

Princeton, NJ 

Economics 



John J. Pambianchi 
Saugus, MA 
Psychology 



Sonija T. Parson | 
Washington, D.C. 
Women and Gender Studi<i 







( 



Tyler J. Paul 

Great Falls, MT 

Political Science/Russian 



Christopher F. Petrella 

Somers, CT 

Religion 



John F. Phelan 

Guilford, CT 
Political Science 




r 


b^ 




% 


1 


V 



Rachel E. Philio 

Gouldsboro, ME 

Mathematics 



Khoabane Phoofolo 

Maseru, Lesotho 

Economics/Political Science 



Helen L. Pitlick 

Palo Alto, C A 

Russian 



Brenton A. Pitt 

Duxbury, MA 

Economics 




Daniel R. Pitts 

Wenham, MA 

Chemistry 



Allegra G. Poggio 

Wellesley, MA 

Psychology 



Alexandra H. Porr 

Cortlandt Manor, NY 

Political Science 



David H. Pritchard 

Narberth, PA 
French/Sociology 




Nathaniel A. Purinton 

Toledo, OH 

History 



Stephen G. Puschel 

Greenwich, CT 

English 



Jacqueline E. Raicek 

Westmount, Canada 

Biology 



Emily E. Rand 

Groton, MA 
English/French 




Catherine L. Reedy 
Wilmette. IL 
Psychology 



Marcia E. Reinauer 

North Granby, CT 

EngUsh 



Eamonn L. Reynolds-Mohler 

Williamstown, MA 

Economics 



William H. Richards 
Easton, CT 
Economics 



® 




John P. Ritzo 

Kingfield, ME 

Philosophy 



Jesse L. Robbins 

Searsmont, ME 

Economics 



Karl-Gustav Rueggeberg 

Greenwich, CT 

Biological Chemistry 



Kirby J. Sabra 

Somerset, MA 

Political Science, Russian 



Srilagna Saha 

Kolkata, India 

Economics 



Ryo Sakai 

Gifu-Ken, Japan 

Biological Chemistry 



Christina E. Saunders 

Park City. UT 

Art and Visual Culture/English 



Anna C. Schechter 

Hartford, CT 

Interdisciplinary Studies 



Tyler S. Schmelz 

Monmouth Beach, NJ 

Political Science 



Kate E. R. Russell 

Scarborough, ME 

Biological Chemistry 




Elizabeth M. Santy 

New Haven, CT 

Psychology 




Machias W. Schoen 

Wilton, ME 

Environmental Studies 




Jesse A. Schoonmaker 

Durham, NH 

Biological Chemistry 



Patrick J. Schule 

Waquoit, MA 

Biology 



Lily Anne-Marie Scott 
Livingston, MT 
Anthropology 



Nichole E. Scott 

Dayton, WY 

Art and Visucd Culture 




David C. Shear 

Concord, MA 

Economics 



Elizabeth J. Sheridan-Rossi 
Topsfield, MA 
Mathematics 



Anna J. Skeele 

Winchester, MA 

Psychology 




Kathryn Somers 

Roseville, MN 

American Cultural Studies 



Rachel E. Sorlien 

North Sandwich, NH 

Politiccd Science 



Ryan Daniel Souliotis 

Salisbury, MA 

Political Science 



Matthew P. Sposito 

Glastonbury, CT 

EngUsh 




David A. Squires 

Berlin, VT 

Enghsh 



Kerrin O. Staskawicz 

Berkeley, CA 

Spanish 



Andrew W. Stifler 

Essex Junction, VT 

Economics 



Sara D. Stone 

Darien, CT 

Women and Gender Studies 




Andrew G. Stowe 

Wallingford, CT 

Biology 



Stoyan T. Stoyanov 

Plovdiv, Bulgaria 

Economics/Mathematics 



Justin S. Streen 
Kansas City, MO 
Political Science 



Jemma K. B. Stromwick 
Brookline, MA 
American Cultural Studi* 



'r 




Joshua T. Stuebing 

Needham, MA 

PoliticEil Science 



Erika Tanaka 

Yokohama, Japan 

Neuroscience 



Alexander G. S. Teague 

Concord. NH 

Biology 



Kristina S. T. Haagen 

Newington, NH 

Psychology 




Kilian J. F. Thorin 

Washington, D.C. 

Philosophy 



Lucia Tiererova 

Partizanske, Slovakia 

Economics/Mathematics 



Anne E. Tieman 

Exeter, NH 

American Cultural Studies/ 

Rhetoric 



Adam J. Tokarz 

East Bridgewater, MA 

English 




Danielle M. Touhey 

Franklin, MA 
Biological Chemistry 



Emily G. Trono 

East Montpelier. VT 

Political Science 



Shannon E. TuUy 

Needham, MA 

Psychology 



Emily H. Ulfelder 

Duxbury, MA 

Biology 




180 



Katharina R. Unger 

Concord, NH 
Biological Chemistry 



Alison J. Vander Zanden 

Southwest Harbor, ME 

Women and Gender Studies 



William P. Vayakomvichit 
Bangkok, Thailand 
Art & Visual Culture/Economic 




Jenna R. Vendil 

Daly City, CA 

American Cultural Studies/ 

Political Science 



Jo Anne D. P. Villarosa 

Tracy, CA 

Rhetoric 



Lucas D. Vitas 

Atkinson, NH 

Sociology 



Ann E. Wachnicki 

Norwalk, CT 

Art and Visual Culture 




Whitney B. Warren 

Houston, TX 

Art and Visual Culture 



David C. Waters-Honcu 

Pleasanton, CA 

Biology 



Ashley L. Wentworth 

North Andover, MA 

Sociology 



Victoria M. Westgate 

Wausau, WI 

Rhetoric 




Divna M. Wheelwright 

Monro Bay, CA 

African American Studies/ 

EngUsh 



Kimberly J. Whipkey 

Portland, ME 

Sociology 



Jameson F. White 

Summit, NJ 

Political Science 



Lauren A. White 

Shaker Heights, OH 

Sociology 




Anne B. Whiting 

Contoocook, NH 

Neuroscience 



Nachelle L. Wiegman 
Brunswick, ME 
Political Science 



Sarah A. Willhoite 

Freeport, ME 

Spanish 



Eric C. Williams 

Carver, MA 

English 



@ 




Michael R. Williams 

Cordele, GA 

Economics /Political Science 



Oliver J. Wolf 

Pittsburgh, PA 

Political Science 



Adam P. Worrall 

Duxbury, MA 

Economics 



Yoongi Yang _ 

Seoul, Republic of Korea ■ 
Theater 




Benjamin Yoon 

Springfield, VA 

Biology 



Jin Zhang 

Kennebunk, ME 

Biological Chemistry/ 

Economics 



Daniel R. Zohn 

Santa Monica, CA 

Political Science 



Joshua S. Zuckerman 

Chatham, MA 

English 




Hallie E. Preston 

Bedford, NY 

Environmental Studies 



Stormont Fisher Qua 

Cambridge, NY 

History 



Eliza B. Roberts 

Andover, MA 

Environmental Studies/Russian 



Adam G. Roux 

Harvard, MA 

History 




L8Z 

r 



Katie J. Seamon 

Leverett, MA 
Political Science 



Julia C. Simons 

Bethesda, MD 

Biology 



Alexander Z. Smith 

South Portland, ME 

Physics 



Penelope A. Taylor 

Scarborough, ME 

Anthropology 




Vanni T. Thach 

Camden, NJ 

English 



Jose G. V. Tungol 

Presque Isle, ME 

Neurosclence 



Jeremiah L. Vernon 

New London, NH 

Biology 



Ryan B. Sparks 

Dallas, TX 

History 




Lucy M. Wall 

Nesconset, CT 

Sociology 



Samuel G. Witherbee 

Cape Neddick, ME 

History 



Andrea E. Wolf 

Nashville, TN 

Environmental Studies 



Julie D. Yeterian 
Sidney, ME 
Psychology 



Seniors Not Pictured 



Aleena D. Ali 
Elizabeth J. An tin 
John A. Atchley 
Nicholas S. Bartlett ys. 
Alexandra S. Battestin 
Erin C. Beirne 
Sherika L. Blevins 
Mark P. Boccard 
Christopher C. Casey 
Luther W. Caviness 
Katherine A. Celeste 
Roy A. Costa III 
Kevin D. Crighton^r 
Elizabeth C. Currie \ 
Matthew J. DeFina^ 
Ingrid H. Denkewalter 
Derek J. V. DiGregorio 
Kyle J. Easton V. t 
Charles J. Engasser ^ 
Tobias F. Fischer 
Emily R. Fisken 
Mario A. F. FurlonI 
K. C. Godsey 
Carmen T. Gomez 
Molly A. Graham 



fA/i 



Justin C. Graves 

Andrew D. Hennessey -S^versQi 

Tamotsu G. Hirai —— ^ 

Melissa A. Jubel 

Kim D. Kariuki 

Paul C. Kazarian 

Jordan L. J. Keeler 

Timothy J. Kirkman 

Jeremy A. Kross 

Michael G. LaButti 

Patrick T. Langetieg 

Tyler G. Lappetito 

Gregory T. Leonard^J 



James A. Liddell 
Matthew W. Lipstein 
Robert M. Loomis ^ 
Trevor M. Margraf J 
Luis C. Martinez il 
Jon P. Mehr ^ 
Michael J. Metzger 
Tyler A. Middleton 
Noah A. Miller 
Brian P, Muchmon 
Mus tafaji. Na b 



Shaheen Nazerali 
Maureen F. Noble 
Julia Nosov 
Lauren M. Perreault 
jcott H. Priest 
Lori-Anne C. Ramsay 
Ariel R. Rosenberg 
Brendan T. Royston 
Dmitri C. Russell 
Patrick H. Sherwood 
Kazuhito D. Shimazu 
Hillary E. Smith 
Nathaniel P. Stambaugh 
Molly E. Stoddard 
Andrew C. Stokes 
Katie J . Thebeau 
Laura M. Tomaselli 
Chelsea A. Tryder 
Natalia W. Tsai 
Norbert Van Boode 
Emily C. Wallar 
Alexandra J. Wenger 
Tyler L. Weymouth 
_^^arah L. Wilson 



7 



QoocCLucI^ 



William Vayakornvichit 

Congratulations for 
your success and 
accomplishment 

We love you 
Dad, Mom, & Michael 




CCass of 20061 




I 



r 



i 



Eamonn Reynolds -Mohler 




It's OVER!! Congratulations. 

Love Guess Who! 



HCongratuiations 



From Ml 
Kilimanjaro 
to wherever 
your future 
takes you. 
here's to many 
more peak 
experiences! 




Love, 

Mom, Dad, 
and Kathleen 

Dan Mastcrson 



TabithaAbrazinski 




Tabltha, 

1bu*ve grown In so 

many ways. 

I'm so proud of 

you! I love you. 

Mom 



Congratulations, Sara! 
We love you! 




Mom, Dad, Chazzie and Erica 



r 



CH^istine Cfi^tn^ui^ci 






\AQ^morie/i/hcv^e/ CK/\oa/^ of hrCn.glri^txy^et^'ier alVthe^fCr^Cvvoyl^ Yotxr 
ivtr^S^ispy, yovir first yyccer halV, your first day atschooV, yoiAr first doA^ce^, 
yotxr first debate vnedcd/, yotAr firstprom/, your first day atcdUege^, yowr fir^ 
colLe^ graduaXXoru. foryou^ oU/lh^vn&rnoide^puttogetixeriiaA^creoit&d/a/ 
wotnari/wJuri^Cridepe'ruievxt, pcLssConatie^, loyal/, detjervnivxj&d/, lovmgf^ ar^d/true/ 
tirlrterseifi 

CoydA^YUie^to- YnaJhe/ vne^morie^^. firu^stre^rigth/wCthlvvyovirself-. 
Take/'d^atroad/l&ss'trcvueledy. Ne^erloie/iCgh^ofyourvi^CoYufi^rthe/WorldK. Iw 
t^rie/pai^ofYn&vvuyrie^yoiA/cr&atjZ/, doinJt forget tiy-loohhax>h, wctvej s*yule^, and/ 
rem&wiber^tose/youyknjow \uClLalwayyhe/ih^ere/to-lo\e/yovi/ar\d/sapportl3'\e/ 
arna^^Cng^woniari/who-Oy^^e/iu^n/ofaU/iier me'morie^. 
Morru, Vad/, and/Kiatt 





Sean Mc%enm 





We always Kneiu 

you loere 

destined for 

great things! 

With much love, 
Mom and Dad 



Brenton , You are a great person and wonderful son. Thanks 
for the memories ! Can't wait for the next chapter ! We love 
you ! Mom, Dad , Will, Erin and Duke 




187, 



Anne Tieman 




Congratulations Annie Bananie! 
Love Mom 



Ryan Souliotis 






. ,1^^^^^^ 


]L 


Ryan, 

You have achieved 


l^/^y 




everything you have 
ever set for yourself. 
Keep up the good 
work. We couldn't 




be any prouder. 
All our love. 


1 1 .H m 


H 


Mom, and Dad. 




1^^ 







Evan Fulton Kornack 


Evan, here Is 


H^H^^^P 


to "smooth 


WP^H^t" ^., 


sailing ahead." 


^m ^i^^^hU 


We are so 


WL^^S^^^^^ 


proud of you! 


1^ 


All our love. 


. 


Dad, Mom, W Umiliy | 


Elise and Luke 


' — 







_^- 



t^ta^c^ 



C Cfl^t^l-. 



ciS^ 





(_-0j 



^n 



.onaratuiatiom _y^nna. 
.^y^na alwatji remember the 
Ljeoioaical ^im.eicaie! 
r=JLoue alwaui, It lorn, ^J-Jaa 
ana (JJ>nice -.^llen 



Emily Gilmore Trono 




Dear Emily, 
Our sweet little girl is now an incredibly 
caring, responsible, intelligent and self- 
sufficient young woman. You have excelled in 
spite of great adversity. You have set your 
priorities and never wavered. 
As George Halas said: "Nobody who ever gave 
their best, regretted it." Emily, we couldn't be 
more proud of the woman you've become. 
With all our love. 
Mom, Dad and Kate. 







188 . 



J^ri ^jR^senderg 





Ari, We love you, and wish you a joyful life. Dad, Mom, Michael and Sarah 



Dear Patrick, Patrick John Schule 

Congratulations! Many years ago, when I graduated from seminary, 
my Dad shared some meaningful thoughts for living life. In that 
spirit, I share with you his thoughts: "Live each day to the fullest. 
Get the most from each hour, each day and each age of your life. 
Then you can look forward with confidence, and back without 
regrets. Be yourself-be your best self. Dare to be different and to 
follow your own star. Don't be afraid to be happy. Enjoy what is 
beautiful. Love with all your heart and soul. Believe that those you 
love, love you. And, remember you cannot have love without 
forgiveness. Forget what you have done for your friends and 
remember what they have done for you. Disregard what the world 
owes you and concentrate on what you owe the world. Treat others 
the way you yourself like to be treated. Be faithful. Make good 
memories.When you are faced with a decision, make that decision 
as wisely as possible, then forget it. The moment of absolute 
certainty never arrives. Above all, remember that God helps those 
who help themselves. ..so, pray as if everything depends upon God 
and work as if everything depends upon you". As your grandmother's 
uncle Friedrich wrote: "Live that you may desire to live again- that 
is your duty - for in any case you will live again. "And, Pat, if you from 
time to time recall the meaning of the Edgartown Yacht Club 
Clough 

Seamanship 

Award you will 
sail through fair 
weather 
and rough 
seas. 
Again, 

congratulations 
for a job well-done. 
Love, Dad 




O^eCen 'PitCic^ 




n03jpillJ.ilHt\\l (. >CneiUHblM OKOH'iaHHeVl 

> iiiiiM^IMiHrrra . ^"(muom i.().u.iiin\\( ihvxob 

NJclMM B HOBOM v^riinO >KH.iHH . 



Love, 

Mom, Dad, & Carl 



r 



Stephen 6. Puschel 



Stephen- You have had four great years at Bates! We 
are so proud of you and wish you happiness and success in all 
that you do..* 




ith much love, Mom, Dad, Andrew, Jacques, and Sophie 



190. 




Ai^Al^CC 




^^ 



To Anna and her friends 




We all take different paths in life, but wherever we go, 

we take a little of each other with us. 
Congratulations and love, Mom and Dad 




Connor Boyle 




"Life is too 

important to be 

taken seriously." 

- Oscar Wilde 

Congratulations 

Connor and 

Class of 2006! 



(D 




^/^ 



<:z^i:^t^t^ ~.^_^^-^ ^ f^ t:f ^ i 




Look out world. 
Here I come! 



Kendall we are so proud 
of you. 

Love-now & forever. . . Dad, 
Mom, Laura Lily & Oliver 




Congratulations, Rachel! 

We are all so proud of you, and we 
love you dearly! May the years ahead 
bring you much happiness and success! 

All our love, 

Mom, Dad, Becky, Meghan, and 
Aaron xoxo 



amo, 



To our amazing 
daughter, Carie... 
You have made us so 
proud. To say, "we 
love you' is such an 
understatement 
-Mom and Dad. 



L 



I love a careless 

streamlet, 

That takes a mad-cap 

leap, 

And like a sparkling 

beamlet 

Goes dashing down the 

steep. 

— Thoreau 

With love and joy for 

your future, 

Mom and Dad. 





192 A 



Luke, 




We hope that the quality of warmth that 

you possess will be extended to others 

throughout your life. 

We are so proud! Congratulations! 

With Love, 

Mom, Dad, and Jamie 



193, 



Dear Maureen- 
May the joy continue. 




Lx)ve, 

Mom and Dad, Ian and Michelle 



© 



S^adi 



m 



Your parents 

and Bates 
provided the 
opportunity, 

but you 

provided the 

effort and the 

determination 

to excel.You did 

us all proud. 

Best Wishes for 
a bright future. 

Love you, 
Mom and Dad. 




<?','c 



r ii 



/ 



Alison Vander Zanden 


Congratulations, Alison! 


jrn 


"To be the 




person you will 


^^^^^^^^^^Bhl '*»'"^||^ 


respect, the pen 


^^^^^^^^Hi^B ' 


that writes 




your life story 




must be held in 




your own hand" 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^K 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^V 


Love Mom, 




Tom, Lauren 




and Kristie 







Then, as now, always dressed for success. And success, we 
are certain, you will find in whatever you choose to do. After 
four great years at wonderful Bates, filled with lessons, 
laughs and loving friends, you've only just begun, with 
many, many more great years and a wonderful life ahead. 
And countless more fabulous outfits. Thanks for letting us 
tag along for the first 21 years. We cherish the joy you've 
brought to our lives. Congratulations, Sarah. We are so 
proud of you, and we love you oh so much. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Peter, Ben 





Emily Wallar 



mmmmWB^M 




^^^^^^^^H 






1 


^^V^^^^^^^^H 



Congratulations and good luck to Emily Wallar, 
with love from proud parents, James and 
Gale, brother, Nick. Never give up on your 
quest for adventure... and for fine cuisine! 



T 








■e »3R ^ 











UovVTo^'^'^^?' 5h<5i3 '^'^^'^ ^' 



/t^ 






,/ 



>o\a ^/d C)f r"^^ l^lU- 



f'^ 




\ena 




a 



c^oiro 



JoFltl ^tieCcin 




l-xefedTch, 
|'\e?ecircn, 
l-xerecn 



Ljeft Of everything in tlie future, 
Oiena. 

e love Ljoul \_JaA, \ |om and |\|cite 



Jofin, 




!A[zuays ((eep zuftatyou have [earned from your 
famify and your cotiege as you continue to challenge 
yourseff aru{ pursue new fieig fits. 

Tfie Tfietan family 



r 



T^^^ije^jyr ^^e:^\e:y^ 



Co^G^^JWLKTiOHS^ Tracey/ One Helluva Job/ And this is just the 

BEGINNING ♦..♦ 




£: 




^ 




Love Mom, Papa and Rollo. 



T 




Jamie O^issen 


^^^^^^l^^l^^jfl 1 


You 


^VS^^^K^I 


always 


^^^B^^^^^^^^^^^^I^^H 


step up to 


^V^^^^^^HPH 


the plate- 


[^^hPRVIp^^ 


We love 


^^5^^ -^ j| 


you; 


JfN 


Keep 


\ MJ N 


Winning! 


Mom, 
Dad& 


I ^-^^^^^^ 


Emily 


"TB^^/^v^^ 




' ^ft'^'l 



Omar WiaxjveCC 

Congratulations Omar, we ziHsfi 
you Qod's blessings for a 
successful 
future, 
% Barents 
and relatives 




198, 




Dear Jaccqueline, 

Congratulations On a job well done! You have worked hard, experienced so much and grown to be an amazing 

young woman! We are very proud of you and all that you have accomplished. We wish you joy, happiness and 

continued success as you journey through life. 

With great love. 

Mommy, Daddy, Douglas & Margot 



(Eri^ n^ana^ 


Erika Congratulations!! 


We are very 


^^^^^^^^R^ .^^^l^^^^^^^l 


proud of your 


.^ohH^^I 


accomplishments. 


^^^mv^^^^ 


Believe in 


,^^^^t'^ ^ i^^^^l 


yourself; 


|H^c 4^^| 


remember, 


^^^Bjrf^^^H 


FAITH WILL 


fl^^H^^r^^l 


MOVE 


^^^B^V ^^1 


MOUNTAINS. 


^^^^^HL ^^1 


Lots of Love, 


^^^^^^^^^^1 


Dad and Mom. 


^^1 





yi . Scixvye 

Sawyer, 


*r ^JrctFiy 

We always Iqiew 
that you and your 
class would 6e going 
places, so "May-the 
road rise to meet 
you, 

fMay the lOindSe 
always at your 
Sacl^." 

J^nd rememSer, 
"...the o?(en are 
slow, But the earth 
is patient." 

Love, 

Mom, (Dad, and Whit 


^- 











(£ 



Joftn WLcChfuCty \ Mattfjeiv gposito 



John McNulty, 




'Go confidently in the directions of your dreams! 
Live the hfe you imagined" - Thoreau 

With Love, 
Mom, Dad & Laura 




A JOB WELL DONE-MUCH SUCCESS. 
Love, Peter, Marion, Lauren, & Chris 




Cheer up Amanda! Graduation 

doesn't mean the end of your 

education! 

And remember, adults are just 

children... 

...with $$$ more money $$$!! 

WE ARE SO PROUD OF YOU!!! 

Lx)ve, 

Mom, & Dad 




200 



^^^^^^iz/^^v^^lri^ ^^^^^d^ 



Katy Reedy! 

We are truly proud of your 

Accomplishments at Bates. 

You are brilliant and 

dedicated. 

Beautiful and sweet, and 

We know the world will 

Love you as much as we 

do! 

Love, Peace and Happiness 

from all of us, 

Mom, Dad, Amy, Jack, 

Mick, Erik, 

Teddy and Bobby 




Sarah Judice 



Sarah, 

Life has many chapters and with each ending comes a new 

beginning; each one new builds oon the one just finished. 

So it is with your graduation from Bates. You will carry 

with you memories, learning, and cherished friendships. 

Congratulations and well done. We are proud of you. 

With love, 

Mom, Dad, and Elyse. 




Aaron Nossif 




Aaron, 

Congratulations on your Graduation 

& Best Wishes for a Happy Future! 

Love Mom, Dad, Peter and Johnny 



© 



Jonathan QeCarCo 





# # # # w w w 

wherever you go and 
whatever you do, 

Moy the luck of the 
Irish be there with you. 




Nate Stambaugh 



Nate, you are a 
wonderful, thoughtful, 

and kind person, 
who is passionately 
curious. 
You fill the world 
with brightness. 
Nate, here is to 
nnore great 
experiences, 
success, and 
happiness ahead! 



All Our Love, 
Tom, Monn, Gma, 
Dan and Chaitra 




© 



Zachary MueCCer 




To Zach- 
Best of luck. We love you. 

Mom, Dad, Jill, Steph, 
Satchel and Scarlett 



Allison Coville 



pRfll^p)^^^^^^^^ 




^ssst 


/V ^»s.^^^^« ^^^^^' j^ 


' 


I^^K-M^ 



Allison, 

We are so proud of you and your accomplishments at 
Bates and we are so grateful for the opportunities we 
have had to share in your college experiences. You have 
worked so hard and we are certain of a bright future 
ahead. We have always believed in you and more 
importantly, you believed in yourself. 
With all our love and best wishes. Mom and Dad. 





You have always set high expectations 
for yourself. Your unwavering 
"perseverance and determination" have 
helped you achieve your goals. We are 
so proud of you and all of your 
accomplishments ! 

Love Mom, Dad, and Kevin 



Todd Myers 

You are an amazing, wonderful young 
man. We couldn 'f be prouder We are so 
lucky to have you in our lives. 



Words could never express how much we 

love you. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad and Justin 




'Yt-Xing J/wa 




Congratulations 
dear! We love 
you and our 
prayers are 
with you as you 
enter the next 
phase of your 
life. May it be 
one of much 
joy and 
fulfillment for 
you. 



® 



The most important thing about Lindley 

is that she likes going in the woods. She 

likes picking up trash. She likes playing 

the piano. She also likes riding her bike 

with her friends. But the most important 

thing about Lindley is that she likes going 

in the woods. 

-Miss Andrews' 1" Grade Class 
Van Sciver Elementar>' School 




Congratulations, Lindley! The woods are calling. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Rob, Dylan & Wizard 



Elizabeth C. Currie 




<?/2 





204 



Brad Sherman Oriel 



^ 




Your journey has taken you from the stages of Bates to Budapest, from 

neuroscience to a cappella. We are so proud of all that you have 

accomplished. You have the ability and determination to fulfill your 

dreams. Reflect on the past four years. Take a breath to focus on the 

future. Have a passion for life's road ahead and cherish every moment. 

Always stay the kind, passionate and humorous person that you are as 

you embark on your next successful chapter. 

With all our love always, 
Mom, Dad, Amanda, and the rest of the family 

p.s. GOOD LUCK ALWAYS BUDDY!! 




From 

inquisitive 

child to 

splendid 

young 

woman, you 

have been a 

joy to watch 

grow! We are 

so proud! All 

our love and 

best wishes 

for the 

journey 

ahead, Dad 

and Mom. 



Jessica 

Dumas 








205, 




2M, 



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Lewiston Middle School 



St. Mary's 

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